The Solarists – Wait For It [TMN PREMIERE]

The Solarists
Wait For It

As summer comes rolling in, I always seem to find myself hunting down a solid collection of indie rock tunes to soundtrack all the adventures that are sure to come. Luckily for me, and all of you, I was offered the opportunity to bring you a first listen of “Wait For It,” the latest offering from Provo-based four-piece The Solarists.

A perfectly intertwined duo of dreamy, wandering verses and a rowdy-as-hell chorus, this tune catches your attention early and grips it throughout the whole ride. The lyrics are approachable and quite memorable, giving you the opportunity to sing along after only a few spins. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if you end up belting this out on your drive home from work today.

“The intro to ‘Wait for It’ had been twinkling in my ear for weeks before we finally took it into the studio. The song evolved into something way bigger than we were ever expecting and we are stoked to finally release it.” – Clint

The Solarists are comprised of childhood friends Clint Purser (bass/sax/lead vocals), Nate Wall (lead guitar/vocals) and Justin Dunkley (drums), with Kaua Sprout (rhythm guitar/vocals) added into the mix a few months after inception. I strongly suggest keeping an eye on them over the next year. With a sound as infectious as theirs, it shouldn’t come as a surprise when these guys really starting picking up steam.

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The Indigo Project – As Always [TMN VIDEO PREMIERE]

The Indigo Project
As Always

Coming hot off a string of successful shows, including Live at Leeds, Yorkshire-based The Indigo Project have something to tide fans over until their next tour.

“As Always,” their first single of 2018, has been making waves for the past month or so, leading the way to cheering fans across the UK this spring. Anthemic in nature, it sizzles with eccentric guitar work, equal parts booming and splashy percussion, and a delightfully raucous chorus. It’s energetic and infectious — the type of tune you can picture yourself screaming at the top of your lungs in a rowdy, humid venue.

The accompanying video, which we’re premiering here today, showcases a Day in the Life-style story, interspersed with live-action shots of Joe Spink (Frontman), Oliver Barry (guitar), Alex Crow (bass), Tony Francis (guitar) and Jack Manktelow (drums). It’s the perfect visualization, according to the band:

A teenage tale of love and loss, “As Always” is about knowing that someone will always come back to you even if it really isn’t good for you

Check out the music video below, then head over and support these lads online.

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[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (Round #3)

Today is the day. The day you try listening to something new. The Indie Dojo is your oyster.

’Honeyfeet – Sinner (Radio Edit)’
’The Underhill Family Orchestra – Chickasaw Fields’
’Oliver Hazard – Hey Louise’
’Any Voices Speak – Necessaries’
’Wildhart – Is It Possible’
’Hannah & Falco – “Eye Of The Storm”‘
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[Synth-Pop/Experimental] John Maus – Running Man

Much to this writer’s delight, we’ve had the chance to shine a welcome light on visionary producer, songwriter, vocalist and multi-instrumentalist John Maus in these recent months. With an impending long-player, Addendum, due out May 18th; we’ve been offering a few pieces of that one, including “Episode”, in the wake of its buildup. A collection of B-sides and new tunes alike, Addendum features 12 additional recordings from his Screen Memories sessions including this latest offering, “Running Man”.

Sharing an aural aesthetic with the 1987 film of the same name, “Running Man” layers staccato synths atop one another and over glistening pads & shuffled percussion all heavily steeped in reverb-y delay. Maus experimented working with an all-analog batch of synths to create his last two records, literally building every rumbling, squelch and blip from the ground up before turning them into full, cohesive movements; and his uniquely personal touch towards his production methods is felt in every inch of his latest works. In anticipation of Addendum‘s release, Maus will be conducting a Reddit AMA via /r/indieheads on Tuesday, May 5th at 5:00 p.m. Eastern; so for our redditor family, polish those questions up and be ready for tomorrow. Until then, stream “Running Man” below.

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[Music Video] Son Lux – The Fool You Need

Son Lux, the genre-skirting synthesis of Los Angeles composer Ryan Lott along with the help of New Yorkers, Rafiq Bhatia on guitar and drummer Ian Chang, have stormed into both this year and this writer’s headspace like a symphonic speeding bullet. Coming off of the heels of an excellent 8th album, Brighter Wounds, which saw release in February, the hyper-talented trio has been garnering loads of worthy critical acclaim in the months since; while touring internationally almost constantly since its release.

Recently Son Lux unveiled the visceral visual accompaniment -directed by Jean-Paul Frenay-  from one of Brighter Wounds‘ standout tunes, “The Fool You Need”. The video, which opens with some rather jarring imagery, fits like an unlikely puzzle piece atop Lott’s cleverly fractured drum patterns and aching vocals. When asked about his work, Frenay relayed that he visually interpreted the track to mirror the endless circle of life, love, and death that it so tragically captures. Son Lux will be maintaining their presence on the road, getting ready to kick off a co-headlining tour with indie-pop princess Kimbra come May 12th. Stream the video for “The Fool You Need” below and check out their forthcoming tour dates after the jump.

Continue reading

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[TMN Interview & Album Review] The Bones of J.R. Jones’ Third Studio Album: Ones to Keep Close

 

“Listening to music is a deeply personal experience and the way one interacts with any art reflects their past.”

 

There’s something distinctly recognizable about American music– whether it goes by blues, roots, Americana, or any similar moniker. Stylistically it’s always soulbaringly expository; a reflection of our rich history of diverse musical influences. There are always those creations that are unmistakably the product of America; sounds that capture the grit of the swampy south, the loneliness of our dusty highways, and the solitude in our mountains. In his third studio album Ones to Keep Close, The Bones of J.R. Jones manages to capture all of these sounds.

 

As the production of solo-artist Jonathon Linaberry, The Bones of J.R. Jones keeps alive the flavors of genres and styles long past their original heyday. In order to better understand the man and the process responsible, check out the interview below:

 

TMN: Can you tell me about some of your influences and what you’ve taken from each of them?


My influences range quite the spectrum… but if I had to pick a handful I would say Son House for his passion and, Springsteen for his melodies, and Tom Waits for his sense of theater.

TMN: If you could get into a room with any musician, contemporary or historic, to make a song, who would it be and why?

 

JL: It would be Howlin Wolf. Nobody can write a swinging blues riff like him.

TMN: You’ve been known to find solace and inspiration in your farmhouse in the Catskills. Can you tell us more about your creative process?

 

JL: There’s not much of a process. It’s more of just sitting still and turning [off] all computers and electronic devices. Forcing myself to do that and forcing myself to be stimulated in other ways is the best to get the creative juices flowing.

TMN: How did you come to acquire your distinctively American sound?

 

JL: Can’t say why that happened. I suppose it’s just the music I fell in love with growing up. You hear something and it resonates with you at moment. It creates an experience for you. That’s something that will stay with you for the rest of your life.

TMN: Were there any seminal moments in your life that influenced your musical ear?

 

JL: For sure, hearing Blind Lemon Jefferson in a dorm room my first year in college changed my trajectory. I wouldn’t be doing what I do now if I hadn’t stumbled in that room so many years ago.

TMN: How would you describe the Americana/blues/soul sound of today? (i.e. where’s the music coming from, what are the themes/messages)


JL: I think there’s a lot of different school of blues. Some try to stay true to their roots. I think that’s it’s own form of respect for where the blues came from. Other’s take what’s been done and try to innovate a bit… in my humble opinion many times that crashes and burns. There is the rare instance where someone comes across and something truly unique and it’s a success… but I feel like that’s few and far between.

TMN: When you aren’t creating music, what do you like to listen to? Any other genres or sounds that you’re a fan of?


JL: I listen to a lot of jazz. Roy Eldridge and Chet Baker is always in rotation these days.

TMN: On lead single “Burden”, you write that “it came out of a place where people search for someone to share the weight of the world”. How has emotional isolation, even loneliness, shaped you as a musician? As a person?

 

JL: It’s shaped quite a bit. I travel by myself. I play music by myself. Spending four weeks on the road by yourself can’t help but influence every facet of your life… socially, creatively or personally.

TMN: Is there a message behind Ones to Keep Close? What would you like to tell your friends as they listen to the album?

 

JL: There is no overall theme or message per se. The record as a whole was an attempt from me to try something a little new. To grow beyond my other records. As a result, it sounds bigger, fuller and hopefully a little more thoughtful. I don’t like telling people what to take away from my music. Listening to music is a deeply personal experience and the way someone interacts with any art reflects their past. If the music is any good it should creates it own theme with the listener. That’s what I hope to do.

Ones to Keep Close is a creation that blends together Linaberry’s diverse influences as a musician, while paying homage to the tenets and traditions of each. As Linaberry says during the interview, he stays true to his roots and his roots are his own– showing respect to his predecessors in the process. Though strictly a solo artist (playing every instrument) in the past, Linaberry incorporates the talents of his friends, artist Nicole Atkins and producer Rob Niederpruem for this latest production.

The whole album is orchestrated around making you feel something; loneliness, exuberance, energy. It has been described as a “stomp-along” experience, and the track titled “The Drop” certainly stands out in this regard. I envisioned hearing this song coming out of a jukebox in a dimly-lit bar on the side of a highway, as you hear the crack of a pool table in the back. “I See You”, a 180 bpm track that ups the album’s pace significantly, ends with classic-blues style triplets that conjure images of American muscle cars doing burnouts. The tracks “Please” and “Sister” employ the use of gospel-inspired call-and-response and hymnal organs, making you feel as though they should heard on the church bench. Ones to Keep Close sounds like the embodiment of American life and culture heard through the lens of music. As you listen to Linaberry’s latest album, think about what feelings the music invokes for you and how that could be a reflection of your past.

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[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (May 2018 Round #2)

Hello and welcome to the wonderful weekly Indie Dojo. Maybe you’ll find something you like, maybe you won’t. The good news is, there’s always next week.
’Otta – small hours’
’Fake Shark – Wake Up (Feat. Fionn)’
’Dutchkid – Glow’
’Agua Roja – Be Alone’
’The Boy and His Dog – I’t Be A Fool’
’Ryvoli – Sleep Talking’
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