7 Acts We Loved At Noise Pop Festival SF, 2/20-3/1 [Festival Review + Playlist]

Flight Facilities-16Now in its 23rd year, Noise Pop Festival has become an absolute staple of the Bay Area for fans of independent music, film and art. With multiple shows every night at some of the best venues SF and Oakland have to offer, Noise Pop presented the best kind of difficult decisions on a daily basis. The Noise Pop HQ, at the newly renovated Swedish American Hall, was a fantastic destination as well hosting intimate shows, happy hours and even a live podcast recording with Toro y Moi where he premiered “Half Dome,” the eighth track from his upcoming album. Although there were plenty of activities outside of the concerts, being the ninjas we are, we’re going to focus on our favorite performances from the week. Browse through some pictures and songs in our chronologically ordered list below.

1. Flight Facilities, 2.24 @ The Regency Ballroom

Why we loved it: Australian DJ duo Flight Facilities, of the esteemed Future Classic, took stage at The Regency in full aviation gear for an energetic set. What really took their performance to the next level was live vocal assistance from talented Owl Eyes and Surahn Sidhu, member of Empire of the Sun, who covered female and male parts of Flight Facilities’ countless hits. [Photos by: Justin Yee]

Flight Facilities
Two Bodies feat. Emma Louise (Extended Version)

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[Get Crunk] Friday Party Playlist (Vol. 138)

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Hey ninjas! So…as you all know, I have been running TMN’s Friday Party Playlist for quite some time now. Unfortunately, this month is nothing but bat shit CRAY, so I will be passing the torch over to ninja Mitch to help keep you satisfied this month. This ninjette will be back in April to continue the party anthems each and every week….but school always comes first. So while you all do beer bongs and twerk on walls, i’ll just sit in the library and let my liver repair itself before Spring Break. See you all in a few weeks.

As always #danceirresponsibly.

Until next month, ninjas.

Flosstradamus feat. Waka Flocka
TTU (TroyBoi Remix)
LeMoti
107th Part Deux (Buku Remix)
Valentino Khan
Deep Down Low (Original Mix)
Maison Cartel
The Cartel
Tincup x Quix x G
Rex x King Tutt
Skrillex & Diplo (Jack Ü) X Justin Bieber
Where Are Ü Now (Halogen Remix)
TWRK
Spring Break (feat. The Rej3ctz & Dougie F)
um..
dont copy us
I See Stars
Murder Mitten (Dotcom Remix)
Aazar x Rae Sremmurd
Come Get Her
TroyBoi
No Substitute ft. Y.A.S
dabow
the last round he was going to fight
Pyramid Scheme and Mk Ultra
Ghost ( Trip V Festival Remix )
Synchronice & Kasum
Glorious (OLWIK Remix)
Reech
Nah Oh
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Howie Lee – Sink Like Titanic [TMN Premiere]

trapdoor records, howie lee, forward thinking, trap music, gangster, tupac, fart noises

Howie Lee, Bejing born and London educated, pursued a degree in sound art opposed to sound design, or audio engineering. He takes the meaning of “deep” to a gallery status. The jazzy time signatures on “Sink Like Titanic” create a groove that provoke more thought than rigid 4/4 time signatures.

Discover more from Howie Lee on Soundcloud, Facebook and Twitter.

Howie Lee & LinFeng
Sink Like Titanic
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[NEW] Kid Cudi – Love

Cudder
Kid Cudi
love.

Kid Cudi has been showcasing his versatile talents outside of music recently–from starring in acclaimed Sundance films to joining the cast of Comedy Bang Bang. Even with a budding acting career, though, he recently announced  that he’ll be working on the long anticipated next chapter in the Man on the Moon series with the same team of collaborators who helped created his classic debut. This morning, Cudder took to Soundcloud to sneak release a new loosie titled “love.” Keeping the throwback vibes alive, Dot Da Genius, the producer behind “Day and Night” among other hits, adds to Cudi’s own production featuring a Ratatat sample making the perfect backdrop for his signature swooning, uplifting vocals. The chorus on this one erupts into stadium-worthy proportions and the layering of Ratatat guitar riffs add to that epic sound. Hopefully we’ll hear MOTM3 sooner rather than later but this should do a great job holding fans over until then.

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[NEW] Snakehips & Tory Lanez – Dímelo

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Snakehips x Tory Lanez
Dímelo #songsfromscratch

Corporate involvement in music often comes under scrutiny, but Adidas Originals’ partnership with Yours Truly for the #SongsFromScratch series has been one of the most important recent endeavors in music. Uniting artists who typically wouldn’t collaborate, the program has churned out some of the most prolific creations in recent memory. The latest entry in the series is an international affair, as we find Canadian extraordinaire Tory Lanez striking up a partnership with the UK’s Snakehips for “Dímelo.”

“Dímelo” is a perfect blending of both Tory’s and Snakehips’ individual styles. “Dímelo” shares much of the whimsical charm of a typical Snakehips production but with an added hip-hop flare. Tory on the other hand abandons his grittier, more lo-fi sound in favor of something a bit more upbeat, though his swagger remains tightly intact.

Listen to the tune above and make sure to watch the process that went behind the single at the official Songs From Scratch website. Also feel free to check out our recent interview with Tory Lanez as well.

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[Future] Beshken – Hiro

HiroArt
Beshken
Hiro

There’s an interesting, almost cinematic approach in this new original Beshken tune. The chopped and panned vocals flutter along beside a cacophony of other sounds until it resolves into a lush and textured rhythm with pounding drums and a blanket of warm synths. Besh’s work is never short of emotive elements, and his shift from futuristic, hip-hop remixes to his own songs has shown quite a bit of growth for him in recent months.

The Next Wave artist is hitting a formative point in his musical journey and “Hiro,” which is defined as “generous and tolerant” in Japanese, is evident of his changing approach to the material he is putting out. This track will hold us over nicely while his upcoming EP is in the works, and it’s even available for free download here. Beshken and Next Wave are setting up a big 2015 so far, and “Hiro” is just the tip of the iceberg.

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Get to Know: Feed Me Jack [TMN Exclusive Interview/Event Preview]

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We’re really excited to be teaming up with the Make It Funky SF collective to put on a series of showcases in California highlighting local talent. Launching this Saturday, February 21st at El Rio in San Francisco, the first installment will feature experimental indie band Feed Me Jack and the folky, electronic vibes of Mosaics with support from acoustic soul duo, The Kakaroaches making for an eclectic mix of styles. As part of the series, we’ll be catching up with some of the performers to shed light on up ‘n coming musicians. RSVP at the link below. 

Feed Me Jack
Knight Fork

Since we were first introduced to Oakland-based Feed Me Jack a couple years back, they’ve quickly become one of our favorite up ‘n coming indie bands. The collective musical talents of the group have allowed them to perfect, and build on, a broad range of musical styles and influences. Their 2012 debut, Chumpfrey, recorded during their time at UC Santa Cruz, embodies their prowess and versatility, but the follow-up Anatolia EP saw FMJ combining their skill set with a seemingly endless amount of creativity for a cohesive, flowing sound all their own. We caught up with Sven Gamsky (guitar/vocals), Cameron Lampert (bass/vocals) and Jake Thornton (keyboard), 3 of the 5 members of Feed Me Jack (Robert Luisi on guitar/vocals and Eric Lawson on drums are the other two), in advance of their upcoming show. Enjoy the interview below, head to FMJ’s website to grab a bunch of great music and catch them at our showcase at El Rio this Saturday, it’s not one you’ll want to miss!

RSVP: Make It Funky & Music Ninja Present: Feed Me Jack, Mosaics and The Kakaroaches

 

TMN: So, you all first met at UC Santa Cruz. Can you talk a bit about how you all got together?

Sven: It was freshman year when I first met Robert. I was just in the quad, around the dorms, and heard some beautiful guitar wafting down from up high. I just kind of followed my ears and found the room where the guitar was coming from. I didn’t know Robert before that but I introduced myself and showed him a song that I had written. He recorded it and wrote a bass line for that song. That later became “Pirate Muse.” Then, we added a friend of ours who was our old drummer. So we had him and two guitar players, but we played one of the guitars out of a bass amp and had a sub-octave pedal to lower it to that range.

Cameron: So, the original bass player was not actually a bass player, it was just a pedal.

Sven: From that point on, we were kind of moving around until we found the right sound and group. We added Cameron as a permanent bass player and collaborator along with Eric as our new drummer.

Feed Me Jack
Definitely You

TMN: There are so many different styles infused in your sound—ska/reggae,  jam bands and sometimes even stuff like The Strokes just to name a few. Who are some of the bands and artists that influenced your sound?

Cameron: The Strokes are definitely an influence and Grizzly Bear. But really, music is derivative and we definitely acknowledge that. I think we love listening to all sorts of different stuff and really, I hate to use the classification of World music because all music comes from the world, but all music finds its place in our sound. Especially guitar music, plus The Beatles and classics like that.

Jake: I would say the first album, Chumpfrey, draws on a lot more of the influences that you mentioned first. We all think that was more of an accessible sound, a little more pop influenced, than some of our more recent stuff. We’ve really been striving to come with different sounds and go in more of an experimental direction while maintaining the influences that are still with us.

TMN: How did that process of putting together something as cohesive as Anatolia compare with the experiences behind Chumpfrey? Was that shift a conscious effort? 

Sven: Yeah, I think it was kind of a conscious effort. The Anatolia EP was an attempt to go with a little more of an atmospheric and visceral sound focused more on the composition, which is just writing a song that doesn’t have any recurring parts. It was kind of a journey from beginning to end. We’ve been messing with the idea that we want to have one piece of music as an album with all the songs bleeding into each other. So, we kind of tried to create transitions that connect the songs to make one larger piece of music—basically like a twenty minute song.

Jake: It was definitely more of a concept album for us and it also marked our transition from college, house-party type of music into a more identifiable sound. Continue reading

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