[Interview/Deep-House] TMN Gets Burnt With SNBRN + 50 Cent – 21 Questions (SNBRN Remix)

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50 Cent
21 Questions (SNBRN Remix)

It’s safe to say that we’ve fallen absolutely head over heels for S0-Cal sunny house maestro SNBRN over the last few months. After two TMN premieres: a remix of Morgan Page’s anthem “In The Air” and a collaborative take with KLATCH on Ace of Base’s “All That She Wants”; both of which caught on like viral wildfire, we thought it was the perfect time to sit down with the blossoming producer and ask him a few questions on behalf of Ninja Land while simultaneously dropping SNBRN’s latest remix of 50 Cent’s “21 Questions”. About the new tune, SNBRN said: “I came across 21 questions a few weeks ago and I thought to myself, I have to remix this track. I wanted to create a fusion of nu disco meets hip hop while still keeping the flow of the vocals. The result was a bouncy, funky remix. Hope you guys enjoy this summer revival and remember to stay burnt.” It’s another refreshing take on a tune we didn’t think would work in the underground, but once again SNBRN revealed his knack for flipping tunes beautifully into dance territory. Check out the SNBRN remix of “21 Questions” above, grab the free download here, and read the full transcript of our interview below.

There always seems to be a wave of eclectic dance music emanating from the L.A. area. Does the surrounding music scene provide a bit of inspiration for you or do you try to shut in and work on your own sound without too much outside influence?

The surrounding scene does have a big roll in the music I produce. LA has become a hub for underground dance music, so I’m constantly being introduced to new tunes. I tend to not jump on the trend bag wagon and make music that I personally want to listen to. I wanted to create a hybrid sound of multiple genres and decades construed into a feeling that a lot of people can relate to.

So far you’ve remixed a couple tunes which premiered on The Music Ninja which were both on fairly opposite ends of the spectrum. First you reworked Morgan Page’s big-room anthem “In The Air” into an incredibly groovy indie-deep cut and then put a deeper, almost gargey lean on Ace of Base’s 90’s pop smash “All She Wants”. Now you’re taking another classic, this time of the hip-hop persuasion with 50 Cent’s “21 Questions” into “burnt” territory. How do you decide which tracks to remix for the most part?

The most important thing to me is originality, remixing tracks that haven’t been touched or that would take people by surprise. I usually start by listening to a bunch of tracks and artists I have written down over a few weeks and see if the track already has 1000 remixes. I then look for an acapella online and typically start by writing an entirely new chord progression to the vocals. I don’t like to use lots of pieces from the original, but more creating a whole new song from the vocal.

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[House] Ludacris – How Low (Action 52 Remix)

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Ludacris
How Low (Action 52 Remix)

Get ready to load up your summertime playlist with a new addition. Mile High City beatsmith duo Action 52 has just released a real pool party gem with their remix of the 2009 Top-40 club smash “How Low.”

This often mysterious outfit have knocked the cobwebs off their laptops and keyboards, returning with their first release since Galantis‘ “Smile.” Faring quite well in the blogosphere, the previously mentioned track garnering support from notable blogs (ahem) and charting on Hype Machine’s Top 50 charts. This time around, they’re taking on a blast from the past, giving Hotlanta’s Ludacris a whole new vibe.

Taking a multi-decade style approach to this genre-fusing remix, Action 52 infuses some 80′s arcade style production with Luda’s classic lyrics toned down for both effect and in an effort to pay respects to the tracks title. Set to the steady tempo of groovy house, it’s sure to please the older club crowd, myself included, who fondly remember dropping down and singing along, often making a fool out of themselves. Don’t judge the moves though, we’re pretty sure you have a few of your own that you’ve since retired.

If you’re into this remix, look to follow these fine gents on Soundcloud. If you happen to be in D-Town, you can catch them at any number of shows. These two often populate the decks at Denver’s newly revived Vinyl Nightclub, which has increasingly seen sold out shows more frequently than ever before.

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Golden Coast – Break My Fall (Monarch Remix) [TMN PREMIERE]

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Golden Coast
Break My Fall (M O N A R C H Remix)

Nineteen days and over a hundred thousand plays. It’s truly remarkable what can come of an artist’s debut song these days. The internet is a beautiful thing for sharing music, and we’re happy to be along for the ride.

As we mentioned above, the original version of “Break My Fall” was the debut track from the newly formed indie pop act, Golden Coast, who have a cheerful pop presence adored by the blogosphere. This tune carries a formidable swagger perfect for your summertime playlists, rife with upbeat synthesized melodies and playful guitar riffs.

After already having seen tremendous success by way of remix, this tune saw Hype Machine glory courtesy of Rainer and Grimm. Today we’re hoping to share a similar success story with M O N A R C H, comprised of  Brennan Strawn, Brent Kutzle, Brian Willett,  and Joel Plotnik.

With slow-paced percussion and a melody worthy of the best 80′s movie climax scene, “Break My Fall” gets a  face lift, sporting some industrial, post-punk undertones. Cinematic in nature, this remix is a nice change of pace when looked at side-by-side with the earlier mentioned interpretation. While it still maintains elements from the memorable original, new light is shined through with this creative remix.

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[Hip-Hop] GoldLink – Ay Ay (Nanpa NOIR Remix)

Ay Ay Nanpa Noir Remix
GoldLink
Ay Ay (Nanpa NOIR Remix)

There’s something to be said about a remix that doesn’t try to do too much. All too often it seems like remixes strive to drastically differentiate themselves from the source material, and while that strategy can help a track stand out on its own two feet, it can also distract from the elements that made the original so great in the first place. 20 year old producer Nanpa NOIR understands these subtleties, and that’s exactly what makes their remix of GoldLink‘s “Ay Ay” so perfect.

A remix’s purpose is to improve upon the sound of the prototype, while also making sure it doesn’t get in its own way. Keeping much of the original intact, Nanpa’s rendition may not sound too different at first, but a closer listen reveals certain intricacies layered in warped production elements, providing the tune with a distinctive and more pronounced sonic identity. Managing to achieve the aforementioned balance of highlighting what we already love about the song, while also improving upon those same aspects, we’d like to hold this up as a shining example of exactly how to execute a remix.

Once you’re finished listening for yourself, make sure to download the track above, and check out Nanpa NOIR’s SoundCloud page for even more incredible remixes.

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[Electronic] Seekae – Test & Recognise (Flume Re-work)

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Seekae
Test & Recognise (Flume Re-work)

Flume is to music what Stanley Kubrick is to film. Yes, that’s a bold statement, but hang in there. We’re going to lay it out for you, point by point. Kubrick was often revered for adapting short stories or novels. While this feat is ultimately impossible through the production of a song, Flume often reinvents songs, giving them an entirely new and refreshing breath of life, similar to what Kubrick did with his films. Some of Flume’s most beloved tracks are remixes of already well-established works, including the likes of classics of the blogosphere age such as Lorde, Chet Faker, and Disclosure.

Too loose of a connection? Didn’t we tell you to bear with us? Kubrick was also considered one of the most influential directors of all time, often exalted on the distinct cinematography utilized in his filmmaking. Look back to 2012 with us for just a bit. In fact, press play on Flume’s self-titled album and tell us that his groundbreaking soundscapes weren’t something to admire. The crackling atmospheric layering coupled with the delicate melodic inclusions paved the way for so many future-bass producers. It’s really quite spectacular when you stop to think about it. One could argue that this sound help pave a way for up and coming artists, just as Kubrick did in his legendary career. Do we dare say that Fluminian will be coined as Kubrickian was?

While we could state the obvious and talk about Kubrick’s intense and immersive use of music to help set up a scene, we’ll slowly walk away from that, as the connection is a bit too easily demonstrated through Flume’s encompassing sounds that easily take his listeners into a world of their own. In fact, this Australian artist doesn’t need visuals to what he does. The music speaks for itself.

We would be remiss not to mention the fact that Kubrick’s films were often considered controversial. A Clockwork Orange, which was a sociopolitical statement about the government’s threat against personal freedom, was probably one of the most notable. While Flume has never done anything to ruffle any feathers, per se, it’s important to look at the timeframe in which he came to the limelight in the world’s collective ear. What was in back in 2012? Big Room? Progressive House? Wasn’t Swedish House Mafia getting ready to embark on their grand farewell tour somewhere around the time that this young man came to recognition? In a world of overwhelming melodies and uplifting vocals, we saw a distinct shift in the paradigm, displaying an entirely new realm of electronic music to delve into. While it didn’t offend anyone in a controversial way, it surely went against the societal grain of the music industry.

One doesn’t need to look far to see the raw talent possessed by this incredible artist, who draws on many similarities of the aforementioned director. At this point, he’s already spoken about in terms of lore, calling on the internet to hit their laptops within hours of his newest release. To be honest, that’s why we’re here with you right now, bringing you a hours old re-work of fellow Australian Seekae. Taking a blissfully familiar approach to this remix, we’re given a glimpse into a world crafted by haunting synths, crackling white noise, and interspersed percussion work. It’s once again spectacular to find this other-worldly approach to production, one that we’ll continually stand by as long as it keeps coming out.

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[Fresh] Lorde – Tennis Court (Diplo’s Andre Agassi Remix)

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Lorde
Tennis Court (Diplo's Andre Agassi Remix)

Just when you thought you couldn’t possibly stomach another ace serving of “Tennis Courts” from New Zealand-based Lorde, this legendary Edgewater producer, better known as Diplo, comes out of left field.

Often considered one of the most influential trendsetters in the music industry, Diplo has taken on a tune that so many of us were pretty much over, giving it another set of legs. Not that we ever had anything against the truly remarkable youngster’s rise to fame, but one can only handle so much of a good thing.

With this particular interpretation, we’re offered up some booming 808 hits and rolling high hat hits that give this tune a fresh, new, trap-style persona. While it has an entirely new look and feel, this remix still holds onto essential connections to the original, giving us a new way to enjoy a song that was once played out.

Bravo, Diplo. Bravo.

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[Melodic Trap] Porter Robinson – The Seconds (NGHTMRE & Davey Gray Remix)

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Porter Robinson
The Seconds Ft. Jano (NGHTMRE & Davey Gray Remix)

Everyone has come to know Porter Robinson very well throughout the years. We don’t know about you, but we have shared countless festival moments with some of his most thought-provoking songs like “Language”, “Spirfire”, or “The Seconds”. Whenever we come across a remix of Porter it almost feels like Christmas to some degree – that is, if it’s actually worth sharing.

Today we have a treat for you from NGTMRE & Davey Gray and their melodic take on Porter’s stunning original, “The Seconds”. The two producers took this classic throwback and gave it a much needed dose of some serious feels for all of us to reminisce about. With it’s trance-like intro and trapped out break down, NGTMRE and Davey Gray definitely gave us a few more seconds to revert back to the pre-Worlds Porter Robinson days. Take a trip down memory lane with this feeler and grab your free download today.

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