[Get Crunk] Clayton’s Friday Party Playlist #65

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Ninjaaaaas! What the fuck is going on out there? We’ll tell you what’s going on, it’s Friday. It’s time to put your work week far behind you and embrace what we’ve all been waiting for: the weekend. Long gone are the days of tired eyes, aching backs, and that one guy with horrible coffee breath. For the next 48 hours, it’s all you baby. So pour yourself a stiff cocktail, press play, throw on something nice, and hit the town. Just make sure to have yourself one hell of an evening. We’ll supply the tunes, as usual.

#danceirresponsibly

Wild Cherry
Play That Funky Music White Boy (Kill Paris Remix)
Dimitri Vegas, Like Mike, Coone
Madness ft. Lil Jon (Oh Snap!! Remix)
Dimitri Vegas & Moguai & Like Mike
Mammoth (Heroes & Villains Vs. Carnage Festival Trap Remix)
Major Lazer
Pon De Floor (Ookay Remix)
2 Chainz
B!rthday Song (JayKode Bootleg)
Arty ft. Fiora
Grand Finale (Lucky Date Remix)
James Egbert
Back To New (ADITIV & Wild Boyz! Remix)
Showtek & Noisecontrollers
Get Loose (Tiesto Remix) w/ Walking on a Dream (Black Boots Bootleg)
Daft Punk
Doin it Right (Rene Kuppens Bootleg)
Ummet Ozcan vs Thomas Gold, Miike Snow
The Cube Wave (Fred McLovin Mashup)
Rock Your Adagio Rock (Leo Laurettis Mashup)
Ferry Corsten Feat. Tiësto
Kayzo
BASSAUR (Original Mix)
Avicii feat. Aloe Blacc
Wake Me Up (Zack Edward Remix)
Fenech Soler
Last Forever (The Chainsmokers Remix)
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[Deep-Disco] Simon & Garfunkel – The Sound of Silence (The Golden Pony Remix)

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Simon & Garfunkel
The Sound Of Silence (The Golden Pony Remix)

Brooklyn’s favorite Electro-Disco revivalists The Golden Pony have had quite the knack for their selections in remixing from Daft Punk to Avicii to Carousel (a track we posted a few months back) and now Simon & Garfunkel, the duo seem to pair their beats symbiotically even with such a classic original like S &G’s “The Sound of Silence”. TGP take their listeners all the way back to 1964 when records were still manufactured on wax and love was as free as that killer whale Willy, but also bring “The Sound of Silence” back to 2013 with a techno sounding deep, arpeggiated synth punching its way over the original chord progression and Paul Simon’s unmistakable vocal intonations sounding as pristine and gorgeous as the day they were recorded. The tune comes as part of a new project from The Golden Pony entitled “Golden Classics” which will see the boys adding their funky-fresh groove to classic tunes from the 60′s all the way up to the 90′s, and as always it’s being offered up as free download through, so grab it while you’re here.

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[Denver Events] This Week at Beta – 8/22

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Being a Top 25 Club from DJ Mag comes at no surprise as Beta Nightclub has been featuring an amazing array of talent this summer, and this weekend is once again no exception.

Being regulars at Beta, we figured we should share their line up with you, in hopes that you’ll come down and rage with us. Also, just like last time, we have arranged for something special.

MUSIC NINJAS GET FREE COVER
Details:
For the shows Thursday, Friday and Saturday, make sure you bring your phone with you. If you’re 21+, get there before 11pm, and show them this post on your phone – your cover is comped. Just make sure to enter through the front door, and not the side VIP entrance. Can’t wait to see you down there!

Lazy Rich - August 22nd
Sander Van Doorn
Joyenergizer (Lazy Rich Remix)

Skism - August 23rd
SKisM
Elixir VIP

Felix Cartal - August 24th
Felix Cartal
Young Love (feat. Koko LaRoo)
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Introducing Birocratic [TMN Exclusive]

Birocratic
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Birocratic
misty
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ergo

The internet is an incredible tool. With sites like YouTube, SoundCloud and Bandcamp, these days it’s become easier than ever to discover new artists. While these avenues help make music more accessible to all of us, it inevitably means there’s a lot more material to sort through. Often times many talented artists can get lost in the shuffle, but once in awhile, you’ll find that diamond in the rough (pardon the cliché), making it all totally worth the effort. While I won’t claim to be the first to discover 20-year-old producer, Birocratic, I would like to take some pleasure in introducing him to you all today.

Instrumental music has never exactly been my forte. Often times instrumentals can seem drawn-out and repetitive, which in many cases ultimately leads to boredom. Birocratic succeeds where others fail, because he keeps things simple. At an average of nearly two minutes, his compositions are easy to digest, yet still possess enough layers to consistently keep your mind stimulated. Biro’s sounds are never boring, even if they are perfect to relax to. As you’ll soon find out, the man behind the music is even more intriguing than the pieces he samples.

TMN: Since this might be the first time many of our readers are hearing your name, let’s start with the basics. How did you come to be known as Birocratic?

Birocratic: My name is Brandon Rowan, and when I first got to college people took to calling me B-Row. Biro is essentially a phoneticized version of my nickname, which I lengthened to Birocratic because I like the subtle tongue-in-cheek connotation. I find that the idea of a bureaucrat who makes hip-hop is a satisfyingly ironic image, and so the name stuck. Also, I didn’t want to be confused with a ballpoint pen, which is called a “biro” in British English.

TMN: I guess that’ll be our little fun fact of the day. Maybe if you decide to pick up the mic one day, Biro might be a more appropriate moniker for you. 

Birocratic: Heh. Well, I highly doubt that’ll happen. If anything, I’ll sing rather than rap, but I’m ironically way more comfortable speaking with instruments – drums, bass, guitar, keys – than with words themselves.

TMN: Let’s follow up with the next natural question. Where did you grow up and where do you currently reside?

Birocratic: I grew up in central New Jersey in a place called Hopewell Valley, a super typical suburban/semi-rural area right smack between Philadelphia and New York. I lived in a farmhouse in the woods there from when I was six until I graduated from high school. From there I moved to Cape May, at the Jersey shore, where my parents still live. I split my time between Cape May during the summer and NYC during the school year, as I’m currently a junior at NYU.

TMN: Alright, let’s dig a little deeper into your background. When did you first get into music, and how long have you been producing for?

Birocratic: My parents put me in piano lessons when I was four. My cousins had moved to Germany and left behind an antique Steinway upright piano, and I used to bang on it until I figured songs out by ear. My parents noticed and got me a teacher, so I learned piano formally until I was 14. I also grew up on a steady diet of classic rock, thanks to my parents and WTHK radio from Philly, which sadly no longer exists. But from there it just kind of blossomed – in late middle school I formed a band with friends, quit piano and taught myself guitar, and steadily became more and more engrossed in music until I realized it was what I wanted to do with my life.

Production started when I was a junior in high school, after I got my first laptop. I kind of just saw it as a natural extension of my passion for music – I could make entire songs by myself without having to get the band together. It was an awesome mental and emotional release, and it was accessible without dealing with the headache-inducing logistics of organizing band practices for a bunch of teenagers who are barely old enough to drive.

TMN: So what impact would you say your environment/upbringing has had on your music?

Birocratic: Man, it’s hard to pinpoint. It’s funny because I make hip-hop now, which is so different from the music I used to listen to during the most formative years of my early childhood. I guess just being surrounded by music all the time and being encouraged to explore my passion is what led to where I am now, even if the specifics don’t seem to line up. And I think some of the unrest I experienced early in high school—mostly traceable to living in the ‘burbs and feeling like everything was so small-time compared to the big city, which we used to visit as a family every year—had a large part to do with my tendency and desire to express myself via music. It allowed me to feel bigger than what my town and my school would allow for, especially since I was always such a quiet kid and had a tough time expressing myself in social situations. It provided the all-too cliché “escape” for my pining young self.

Read the rest of the interview and stream more from Birocratic after the jump

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[Progressive] Deadmau5 – All I Have/All I Had

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It’s not our job to read into the recent onslaught of releases from Deadmau5. You’ll never see us post the “Top 10 pictures of Deadmau5 and Kat,” but you will see us dive headfirst into his music though. Even though his tracks will get ample blog coverage, our long and loving adoration of his music can’t prevent us from jumping on the bandwagon.

With a EDM community obsessed with “drop culture” as we just now dubbed it, it’s overwhelming refreshing to hear Deadmau5 do what he does best: create rich melody driven music. In “All I Have” and “All I Had” we’re once again brought back to what we first came to love about his music. The depth in sound scape is absolutely overwhelming. They’re carefully orchestrated and mapped together, creating a listening experience that can truly take you away from whatever it is that you’re doing.

We don’t know what Mau5 is going through personally, and it’s not our spot to speculate. We’ve all been there before, and we have to imagine that it’s even more painful when the entire blogosphere is talking it up. So instead of guessing, we’ll just press play, sit back, and enjoy the tunes that he’s been dropping as of late.

All I Have
All i had
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[Indie Rock] MT WARNING – Youth Bird

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MT WARNING
Youth Bird

MT WARNING just popped up on our radar with good reason. After hearing this track, we can’t help but draw on associations like Bon Iver. Not that the instrumentals are anything like the Grammy winning artist, but that voice. There’s something we hear that we just can’t ignore.

Vocal similarities aside, Youth Bird is a sweet surf rock inspired tune that bittersweet. While the arrangement and harmonies are uplifting in sound and style, the message in the lyrics is quite different. It’s quite clear that “Youth Bird” is the lament but also the regained freedom of realizing the coveted, but short lived prize of youth.

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[Gloom] Cross My Heart and Hope to Die – Rollercoasting

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Cross My Heart
Rollercoasting

It’s been a while since we’ve featured something on the darker side. With summer coming to an end, we’ve heard plenty of warm sunny tunes. While we love those all the same, we’re excited to finally hear something a little on the macabre. Leave it to legendary experimental hip-hop and bass producer of Cypress Hill fame, DJ Muggs.

Amongst his many other projects this year, Muggs has teamed up with singer Brevi to bring us this cinematic hip hop tune under the moniker Cross My Heart and Hope to Die. The slow twangs of guitar create deliciously gloomy backdrop for Brevi to lay down some softly sung lyrics. It’s eerie, overwhelmingly rich in simplicity, and easy to sing along with.

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