Author Archives: Ash El Gamal

[Electronic] Emancipator – Eve II (Odesza Remix)

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Emancipator
Eve II (ODESZA Remix)

Those of you who have been fans of Odesza from the start might remember that they toured with fellow Pacific Northwest-native Emancipator three years ago or so. Since that time, both acts have continued to expand on their sounds having broad influences on electronic music in their own ways. Although their styles are distinctly separate, there’s an organic nature to their approaches that are very much in line–in other words, if you dig Odesza you’d also like Emancipator and visa versa.

A week from today, Emancipator will be putting out the remix EP from his stellar 2013 album, Dusk to Dawn–if you haven’t checked out the original yet we’d highly recommend it. Today, Odesza unleashed their contribution to that taking on the glimmering, chilled-out “Eve II.” It’s really the perfect canvas for the talented duo as they utilize its shininess to build out a steady house groove all the while maintaining their always-phenomenal percussive aesthetic.

Give it a listen above and look out for the Dusk to Dawn remixes, due out on July 10th, on Emancipator’s Bandcamp page. In the meantime, you can grab a free download of this gem here.

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[NEW] Collarbones – Turning (Flume Remix)

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Collarbones
Turning (Flume Remix)

Flume season has arrived–or did it ever actually end? His debut album had a staying power unlike anything we’ve ever seen in electronic music along with his subsequent work with Emoh Instead as What So Not. From a material standpoint, we haven’t heard much new original work from the Australian beat pioneer, save for the phenomenal “Some Minds,” but he’s most certainly not been dormant either.  Since his rapid ascension, he’s been touring pretty much non-stop releasing a few remixes along the way, often premiering them in live sets.

Today, we get one of the remixes he’s been playing out at festivals and it’s an amazing one that we certainly remember from his set at Sasquatch! festival. Taking on “Turning,” a gorgeous tune from Sydney/Adelaide natives Collarbones, Flume creates a massive and beautiful composition that, in the context of his live set, packs an unbelievable emotional power. In recent interviews, Flume’s been talking about how he doesn’t consider his music “EDM” and you can see what he means on atmospheric tracks like this. We can’t wait for more new material but, in the meantime, this beauty will be in heavy rotation.

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[Future Funk/Jazz] Masego x Medasin – The Pink Polo EP

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Funk and jazz’s cross-genre transcendence may be more prevalent today than ever. To some degree or another, it can be heard in hip-hop, electronic, indie and just about any other style of music you can think of. If you’re still not convinced in listening to contemporary albums from the likes of Kendrick Lamar, The Social Experiment, Thundercat and Griz, look no further than Masego and Medasin‘s recently released funktasitc Pink Polo EP. On the project, Masego, a native of Kingston, Jamaica, plays sax, sings and produces while Medasin, a master of monster beats, contributes a marked bombastic, atmospheric trap vibe through out.

The resulting combination makes for an incredibly unique and enjoyable listening experience that recalls the greats of both funk and jazz while injecting the sounds of contemporary electronic music. Through out the 8-track project, epic sax solos are mixed in with 808s, heavy drops and James Brown-esque vocals–it’s unlike anything we’ve ever heard before. There’s straight party starters on the project like “Shut up and Groove,” “Bounce,” and “Girls That Dance,” but there’s also supreme jams on songs like “Sunday Vibes” that make us wonder what it might sound like if Thelonius Monk had access to modern day recording equipment.

Masego probably sums up the style of this project best in his Soundcloud description calling it “Traphouse Jazz.” The Pink Polo EP, released through the rapidly rising  Film Noir records, arrives right in time for your sunny 4th of July celebrations. Stream it below and, if you’re digging it as much as us, buy it over at Bandcamp.

Masego x Medasin ~ Shut Up & Groove
Masego x Medasin ~ Bounce
Masego x Medasin ~ TrapScat (Get Loose)
Masego x Medasin ~ Sego Hotline ft. Krs.
Masego x Medasin ~ Throwin Shade
Masego x Medasin ~ Sunday Vibes
Masego x Medasin ~ Girls That Dance
JR Jârris
Love Be Like Ft. Masego (Medasin Remix)
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[Hip-Hop] Daye Jack – Soul Glitch (EP Review)

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On his aptly-titled debut mixtape Hello World, Atlanta emcee Daye Jack first showed us that he was special as an emcee. In the year and a half since that release, though, it’s become increasingly evident that rapping was just scratching the surface for the multi-faceted artist. From singing over incredibly jazzy backdrops to delivering quick-hitting raps on future electronic stylings, Jack’s shown us he can do it all and even, at times, seamless fusions of all of the above.

It’s not just the cadence and delivery that are impressive, though, Jack’s nearly always got a perspective and message. Whether it be social injustice, poisonous relationships or life ambitions, the young artist tackles topics with artistry, eloquence and a wisdom beyond his years.

Never have Daye Jack’s range of talents been more apparent than on the Soul Glitch, his latest EP. It’s a completely fluid, yet varied collection of song that solidifies Daye Jack as one of the most progressive artists in hip-hop. The opening track, “First Glitch,” with its future-jazz vibe, sets the tone for the entire project baking in a sprinkle of the project’s surplus of sounds. From there, the project takes a markedly jazzy feel with “Easy” and “Stars Align,” which seem to be inextricably tied through contrast–the former touching on the struggles of a 9 to 5 and the latter on the triumphs of carrying out your dreams. “Choices,” the next song, continues that theme of life decisions but also introduces the more dance-leaning sound that fully manifests on the Yoko Ono-sampling “Bonds” and “Trapped In Love.” The closer of the deluxe edition, “Save My Soul,” may pack the most powerful emotional punch from both its massive future electronic production and the incredibly powerful portrayal of inner turmoil. It’s the type of project that demands a full listen from start to finish and, with its variation in styles, can be made to fit just about any listening atmosphere or mood.

Stream Soul Glitch below. You can grab a free download over at Daye Jack’s website or pick up the deluxe edition over at iTunes

Daye Jack
First Glitch
Daye Jack
Easy
Daye Jack
Stars Align
Daye Jack
Choices
Daye Jack
Die Today
Daye Jack
Bonds
Daye Jack
Feed On Love
Daye Jack
Higher / Last Glitch
Daye Jack
Trapped In Love
Daye Jack
Save My Soul
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[TMN PREMIERE] Wicked Man – Soil Leaking Water

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Wicked Man
Soil Leaking Water

With the plethora of genres, sub-genres and micro-genres (yes, we know how ridiculous that sounds) that we’re presented daily as bloggers, it’s not all that common to come across something that feels completely unique. Recently, we were introduced to Oakland three-piece Wicked Man, who possess a sound that’s nearly impossible to place, but draws on indie-folk, jazzy jams and impeccable guitar plucking combined with a nearly-sinister voice. Their debut EP, Fingership, felt like a project of discovery for the band but they’re gearing up for the follow-up and, if the first single is any indication, it’s one you’re going to want to look out for.

“Soil Leaking Water” is built on a sort of haunting, oscillating guitar accentuated by the mischievous vocals of frontman Yonatan Tietz, who’s voice finds itself somewhere between Bob Dylan and Alt-J’s Joe Newman. That instrumental loop is quickly followed by layered synths and steady percussion. From that base, the track develops into a magical composition invoking a range of emotions through out tied together by a common groove–whether it be from the guitar, synths or vocals. The complexity of the instrumentation and dynamic nature of the piece don’t take away from its accessibility, though, and neither does the unconventional crooning.

It’s a jam that oozes a variety of vibes that we’ll definitely be saving for our 4th of July BBQ. Do yourself a favor and give this multiple listens above–it gets better with each one. Wicked Man’s upcoming EP is due out mid-September.

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[Beautiful] Odesza – Memories That You Call (Blackbird Blackbird Remix)

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ODESZA
Memories That You Call (BLACKBIRD BLACKBIRD Remix)

It wouldn’t be entirely accurate to say that any track on Odesza‘s In Return has been overlooked considering it was one of the most popular electronic albums of 2014. That being said, I’ve always felt “Memories That You Call,” especially after hearing it live, was the most powerful cut slipping through the cracks amongst radio hits like “Say My Name” and “Sun Models.” As a result, few producers, besides Henry Krinkle, have elected to remix it rather choosing to focus on the tracks offered up for Odesza’s official remix competitions.

Just a few minutes ago, though, San Francisco producer Blackbird Blackbird dropped an absolutely gorgeous, dynamic take on “Memories That You Call.” His re-imagination opens with the original’s ethereal vocal samples accompanied by glistening sonic elements before building up in a similar fashion as Odesza’s composition but dropping into a tropical groove. Rather than constrain the style to that genre, though, Blackbird brings back the original’s enormous chorus around the 2:49 mark re-layering and re-pitching vocals along the way. That transition drowns back into a beautiful house culmination of the song’s broad-ranged moving parts.

Blackbird’s rendition of “Memories That You Call” proves the perfect example of retaining the best of a song while adding a completely new flavor and cadence. Take a break from your mid-week stresses and soak in the radiance of this fantastic remix. You can grab a free download here.

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Traversing the Ego and Talking Musicianship with The Internet [TMN Exclusive Interview]

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On ‘Ego Death,’ The Internet have truly caught up to their initial vision just around the same time the rest of the music scene is striving to do the same.

The Internet
Special Affair

When The Internet, spearheaded by Syd the Kyd and Matt Martians, put out their first album Purple Naked Ladiesin 2011, they were already ahead of the curve. That debut, which was a collection of the first material the two had ever made together–with Syd on the mic and Matt on the boards–favored jazz, neo-soul, N.E.R.D.-esque vibes tied together with silky R&B vocals and unique hip-hop-tinted lyricism. Their predilection for live instrumentation and extended jams, the type that could be heard on Matt Martian’s Jet Age of Tomorrow projects, led the duo, who first met on MySpace, to put together a 6-piece band that would help them catch up to the ambitions expressed on their debut. The resulting project was their sophomore record, Feel Good, which progressed their sound with the help of that ensemble who brought a marked musicianship to match Matt and Syd’s executive direction.

With deeply collaborative albums like Kendrick Lamar‘s To Pimp a Butterfly and The Social Experiment‘s Surf both solidifying the reincarnation of funk, soul and live instrumentation in hip-hop and R&B, it’s clearer than ever just how innovative The Internet were with their undertakings. Their latest album, Ego Death, which is out now, continues that progression building off the rawness of their debut all the while incorporating the complexity of its predecessor. More than ever, it feels like The Internet, who describe the project as their most collaborative yet, have congealed into sonic bliss.

Musically, Ego Death finds itself in a place minimalism, which is not to be confused with simplicity. There’s gorgeous jams through out on tracks like the Janelle Monae-featuring “Gabby,” moments of bounce on cuts like the Kaytranada-assisted “Girl” and bedroom anthems like “Special Affair.”  What ends up really bringing cohesion to the project are Syd’s captivating voice and the common theme encapsulated by the album’s title–an inner-conflict between a heightened ego and a broken one. On Ego Death, The Internet have truly caught up to their initial vision just around the same time the rest of the music scene is striving to do the same.

We were lucky enough to chat with Syd and Matt about the MySpace days, Odd Future and the making of Ego Death. Pick up your copy and read the full Q&A below. 

Ego Death

 iTunes || Spotify 

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TMN: What were your earliest musical memories, as far as what was playing around the house or anything that you were listening to growing up that you felt like has influenced your sound?

Matt: I think my very first memory was hearing my dad play stuff in the car all the time. My very first memory musically was The Commodores song called “Machine Gun.” It’s a song that has no lyrics or anything, it’s just a fucking jam–a jam-out Commodores song. And I remember I would always ask my dad to play it on repeat, and as a kid I didn’t know this wasn’t normal, but now that I’m older I realize that type of music is not something a normal five year old really grabs onto. Because I’ve never been a trained musician, but I’ve always known what sounded good and what not to do, which is kind of a gift in itself.

Syd: Me, I grew up listening to a lot of like Erykah Badu, Jill Scott, India Arie, Musiq Soulchild and a lot of reggae like a lot of Maxi Priest, Steel Pulse, and Third World. Yeah, my dad is part of kind of a musical family, his brother is very involved in the music industry in Jamaica, and my mom is just like a huge fan of music. She still wants to be an engineer, like me.

TMN: So, building off of that, when did you guys first start making music?

Matt: I would say I started late; I was a late bloomer. I was 17 and it was like my first year of college. It got to the point where I got sick of waiting on my favorite bands to put music out. And I always felt like the good bands took forever to put music out and the trash bands would put music out every three years. So, it was like, you know, N.E.R.D. would come out with an album then you wouldn’t hear shit like, “Nigga I been waiting four years! I’m not gonna wait four years for twelve songs!” So, for me it was more like teach me how to fish, eat forever type of situation.

Syd: I took piano lessons as a kid and all that, but I didn’t start making music on my own until I was like 14 when my dad got me a laptop for school and it had Garage Band. I just started and I knew at that point that I wanted to do something involved in music, I just didn’t know what. Then I realized “oh a producer,” and then I realized “oh I’m not that good at this…” (Laughs). So I just started engineering instead just to stay involved one way or another and to make money.

TMN: So, I know Matt you had done some production work with Odd Future in general. Syd were you the first person to get in touch with Matt or was it through being a member of Odd Future yourself?

Syd: No, Matt was in Odd Future way before me, like years before me. Matt is an original member, he’s like one of the first members. I was a fan of his, because he had the Super 3. I was a fan of the Super 3 so I used to just message him like “Hey, give me advice on beats” and he used to give me advice.

Matt: Right. It’s kind of weird when I think about it now, like we’re best friends and we’re in a band together, because it really was like fate. So, me and Tyler (The Creator) linked up like a few years before I met Syd, this was on MySpace as well. The Internet is just the embodiment of both, and how a lot of our lives have changed because of it. We wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for the Internet. So, we basically connected through MySpace, bouncing ideas, then she got into Odd Future. I was already in Odd Future so we got even closer. It kind of happened organically, how it was supposed to happen. It was nothing forced, it was more so like we both had very similar interests, and we grew up from very similar backgrounds so it just makes a lot of sense.
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