[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (May 2018 Round #3)

We’re rollin’ into summa, summatime like it’s nobody’s business. Better start saving up those free Indie Dojo’s for that continuous summer soundtrack you need in your life. We’ve got enough stock piled playlists to make this summer or any season for that matter, a damn good one.
’Liz Cooper and the Stampede – Mountain Man’
’Bermuda Triangle – Suzanne’
’Ardency – Bad Moon’
’Slow Turismo – Adult Baby’
’Easy Ruckus – Wine & Candles’
’Tāl – What You Are’
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[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (Round #3)

Today is the day. The day you try listening to something new. The Indie Dojo is your oyster.

’Honeyfeet – Sinner (Radio Edit)’
’The Underhill Family Orchestra – Chickasaw Fields’
’Oliver Hazard – Hey Louise’
’Any Voices Speak – Necessaries’
’Wildhart – Is It Possible’
’Hannah & Falco – “Eye Of The Storm”‘
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[TMN Interview & Album Review] The Bones of J.R. Jones’ Third Studio Album: Ones to Keep Close

 

“Listening to music is a deeply personal experience and the way one interacts with any art reflects their past.”

 

There’s something distinctly recognizable about American music– whether it goes by blues, roots, Americana, or any similar moniker. Stylistically it’s always soulbaringly expository; a reflection of our rich history of diverse musical influences. There are always those creations that are unmistakably the product of America; sounds that capture the grit of the swampy south, the loneliness of our dusty highways, and the solitude in our mountains. In his third studio album Ones to Keep Close, The Bones of J.R. Jones manages to capture all of these sounds.

 

As the production of solo-artist Jonathon Linaberry, The Bones of J.R. Jones keeps alive the flavors of genres and styles long past their original heyday. In order to better understand the man and the process responsible, check out the interview below:

 

TMN: Can you tell me about some of your influences and what you’ve taken from each of them?


My influences range quite the spectrum… but if I had to pick a handful I would say Son House for his passion and, Springsteen for his melodies, and Tom Waits for his sense of theater.

TMN: If you could get into a room with any musician, contemporary or historic, to make a song, who would it be and why?

 

JL: It would be Howlin Wolf. Nobody can write a swinging blues riff like him.

TMN: You’ve been known to find solace and inspiration in your farmhouse in the Catskills. Can you tell us more about your creative process?

 

JL: There’s not much of a process. It’s more of just sitting still and turning [off] all computers and electronic devices. Forcing myself to do that and forcing myself to be stimulated in other ways is the best to get the creative juices flowing.

TMN: How did you come to acquire your distinctively American sound?

 

JL: Can’t say why that happened. I suppose it’s just the music I fell in love with growing up. You hear something and it resonates with you at moment. It creates an experience for you. That’s something that will stay with you for the rest of your life.

TMN: Were there any seminal moments in your life that influenced your musical ear?

 

JL: For sure, hearing Blind Lemon Jefferson in a dorm room my first year in college changed my trajectory. I wouldn’t be doing what I do now if I hadn’t stumbled in that room so many years ago.

TMN: How would you describe the Americana/blues/soul sound of today? (i.e. where’s the music coming from, what are the themes/messages)


JL: I think there’s a lot of different school of blues. Some try to stay true to their roots. I think that’s it’s own form of respect for where the blues came from. Other’s take what’s been done and try to innovate a bit… in my humble opinion many times that crashes and burns. There is the rare instance where someone comes across and something truly unique and it’s a success… but I feel like that’s few and far between.

TMN: When you aren’t creating music, what do you like to listen to? Any other genres or sounds that you’re a fan of?


JL: I listen to a lot of jazz. Roy Eldridge and Chet Baker is always in rotation these days.

TMN: On lead single “Burden”, you write that “it came out of a place where people search for someone to share the weight of the world”. How has emotional isolation, even loneliness, shaped you as a musician? As a person?

 

JL: It’s shaped quite a bit. I travel by myself. I play music by myself. Spending four weeks on the road by yourself can’t help but influence every facet of your life… socially, creatively or personally.

TMN: Is there a message behind Ones to Keep Close? What would you like to tell your friends as they listen to the album?

 

JL: There is no overall theme or message per se. The record as a whole was an attempt from me to try something a little new. To grow beyond my other records. As a result, it sounds bigger, fuller and hopefully a little more thoughtful. I don’t like telling people what to take away from my music. Listening to music is a deeply personal experience and the way someone interacts with any art reflects their past. If the music is any good it should creates it own theme with the listener. That’s what I hope to do.

Ones to Keep Close is a creation that blends together Linaberry’s diverse influences as a musician, while paying homage to the tenets and traditions of each. As Linaberry says during the interview, he stays true to his roots and his roots are his own– showing respect to his predecessors in the process. Though strictly a solo artist (playing every instrument) in the past, Linaberry incorporates the talents of his friends, artist Nicole Atkins and producer Rob Niederpruem for this latest production.

The whole album is orchestrated around making you feel something; loneliness, exuberance, energy. It has been described as a “stomp-along” experience, and the track titled “The Drop” certainly stands out in this regard. I envisioned hearing this song coming out of a jukebox in a dimly-lit bar on the side of a highway, as you hear the crack of a pool table in the back. “I See You”, a 180 bpm track that ups the album’s pace significantly, ends with classic-blues style triplets that conjure images of American muscle cars doing burnouts. The tracks “Please” and “Sister” employ the use of gospel-inspired call-and-response and hymnal organs, making you feel as though they should heard on the church bench. Ones to Keep Close sounds like the embodiment of American life and culture heard through the lens of music. As you listen to Linaberry’s latest album, think about what feelings the music invokes for you and how that could be a reflection of your past.

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[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (May 2018 Round #2)

Hello and welcome to the wonderful weekly Indie Dojo. Maybe you’ll find something you like, maybe you won’t. The good news is, there’s always next week.
’Otta – small hours’
’Fake Shark – Wake Up (Feat. Fionn)’
’Dutchkid – Glow’
’Agua Roja – Be Alone’
’The Boy and His Dog – I’t Be A Fool’
’Ryvoli – Sleep Talking’
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[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (May 2018 Round #1)

The Indie Dojo is sorta like those goodie bags you used to get at your friend’s birthday parties as a kid. Full of endless surprises you couldn’t wait to open. The only difference? We’ll keep handing out our bags of indie goodies no matter how old you get.
’Makeness – Who Am I To Follow Love’
’H O N E Y M O A N – We’
’Sleepy Gaucho – Sleepless’
’Loyal Lobos – The Fall’
’Reuben Bidez – What You Really Wanted – Feat. Molly Parden’
’Sam Valdez – Farther Away’
’Hala – What Is Love? Tell Me, Is It Easy?’
’Ann Taylor – Aching’
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[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (April 2018 Round #4)

The weather is warming, festivals are happening & Indie Dojos are a plenty (check out our archive under the “playlist” drop down menu above). Pretty sure were over here living our best lives.

’Dirty Nice – EDIT’
’Tom West – Got It Cheap’
’Rosie Mankato – Dont Be Mad’
’Water Slice – This Way’
’Savi Minds – DREAMING’
’Tom Francis – Pieces’
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[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (April 2018 Round #3)

Avoid FOMTID (Fear of Missing The Indie Dojo). Set your alarms, mark your calendars, write yourself a note on a post-it. Every Tuesday morning, for as long as the future allows, there will be a playlist full of indie jams just waiting here just for you.

’Apre – All Yours’
’Mr Gabriel – Tambourine’
’WILD CHILD – Think It Over’
’ROLE MODEL – girl in new york’
’Alae – Stone Cold’
’Upstairs Open – Chicago’
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