[SF Giveaway + Exclusive Interview] Kodak to Graph @ 1015 Folsom, 4/30

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Kodak to Graph
Los Angeles

Kodak to Graph approaches electronic music in a powerful, novel way that combines a diverse set of sounds with a sensibility that spans from EDM trap to ambient and trance. His debut album, Isa, embodies his versatility capturing a broad range of emotions telling an elaborate story along the way.

The LA-based talent will be stopping through 1015 Folsom in San Francisco next Thursday, April 30th, as part of his Break the Ice Tour and we’re giving away a pair of tickets to one lucky winner! With support from Big Wild and OBESØN, the show promises to not only be a night full of dancing but also one that showcases some particularly organic up ‘n coming electronic styles. We also were lucky to ask Kodak to Graph a few questions about his musical background, putting together his debut album and his live performances. Get to know K2G a bit better in our exclusive interview and enter the giveaway by inputting your email below! The winner will be contacted via email on April 28th, a week from today. You can also still purchase tickets for the show here.

ENTER GIVEAWAY TO WIN 2 TICKETS

Kodak to Graph
Glaciaa

TMN: Can you tell us a bit about how Kodak to Graph came to be and what your earlier explorations into music involved?

Kodak to Graph: K2G began as an outlet for me to release my sappy loop based ‘post-rock’ music back in high-school.  I use to have this delay/loop pedal that would let you loop for about 6 seconds and I would make little loops of guitar, bells, random TV noises, vocals and pretty much anything else that could make noise and kick beats over them for hours.  From there I started playing little house shows for my friends and that’s pretty much when I came up with the name Kodak to Graph. The name comes from an old slide projector that I used for visuals.  It was called a Kodak Ektographic.  I would hang a sheet in front of me, because I was too terrified to perform in front of people, and project slides of old family photographs on the sheet. Most of the first Kodak to Graph recordings were written on my girlfriend’s computer and recorded with one condenser mic. It was all real instruments, the music was kind of reminiscent of old Efterklang, Helios, Sigur Ros etc. There was very minimal electronic influences in the beginnings.  The first record I released as K2G, which I don’t think exists on the internet anymore, was all very melodic chilled out ‘post rock’ / math’y oriented music.  I started getting into electronic music a few years later through my older brother and that’s really when I started to be like, okay let’s see where this can go.

TMN: Your background clearly spans more than just electronic music. Who are some artists you listened to growing up that have impacted your sound? 

K2G: Totally. In middle school I was a die-hard At the Drive In / Mars Volta fan.  I think that was the first time I really discovered experimental/ psychedelic music and I remember being so f#@€ing excited and nutty about how alien that type of music sounded to me. I still find myself pulling inspiration from their music to this day. From there I grew into more melodic/math’y/ambient instrumental bands like Lymbyc Systym, Toe, American Football, Joan of Arc, Mice Parade, Mum, etc. I was first introduced to electronic music by my older brother through cats like DJ Shadow, Four Tet, Clutchy Hopkins, Bonobo, Caribou, etc; Which I feel that style of electronic music was the gateway into electronic music for a lot of people my age. We kind of came from that era where guys were sampling melodic folk records over old funk breaks.  I still have so much love for that sound.

TMN: Isa, your debut album, has a really fascinating and textured sound. Even with the variation, though, there’s a certain almost theatrical aesthetic that really ties it together. What was the recording process like in creating something that cohesive?

K2G: I wrote the record over a span of 2 years so the recording and writing process on the record was ever changing and evolving.  I’m kind of A.D.D when it comes to writing music, so I’ll start tracks by getting really really messy and just layering anything and everything on top of each other then come back to it later and pull layers back.  I don’t generally consider how I’m going to make something sound cohesive when I’m writing the music. In the case of ISA, I chose 10 songs out of a bunch of 50+ or so tracks and moved them around and stitched them together until it created the story I was trying to tell.

Kodak to Graph
Desolation Wilderness

TMN: What’s the most unexpected sound you used in the creation of Isa and on what song?

K2G: Oh man.. There’s so many sounds throughout the record that were very time and place specific that always bring me back to the period of time when I was writing a specific tune.  There is a layer of field recordings in every track on the record.  I always have my iPhone out, recording field noises with voice memo, it gives the tracks a feeling of personality that they wouldn’t have otherwise, – a moment that I can hold on to forever., I’m kind of obsessive over it. In terms of sounds that ended up being completely foreign from their original form, The lead plucky high pitched lead guitar part on ‘desolation wilderness’ was a sample of piano and bass from an old 70’s television excerpt that’s pitched up about 60 semitones and reversed, chopped, stretched, delayed, spread, and filtered. The end product was a pleasant surprise but so different from my original intentions.

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option4 Talks Red Rocks, Bagels, and his Upcoming Originals [TMN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

option4

Each month, our Residency Program brings an intriguing artist, and we’re always excited to get to know a little bit more about them, their history, and their craft.

While the city of Denver might be very familiar with option4, we’re guessing there are a fair number of you who are unfamiliar with this Mile High City icon. We’re going to change that right here, right now. Crack open a cold one, grab a bagel, and get to know Mr. Brennen Brylarly.

TMN: Let’s kick things off by talking about your upcoming releases, if you can speak about them.

O4: Right now, we’re in a different process now with everything option4. Last year, I came out with all those releases, and before I knew it, I had put out 16 releases. Way too much. I got caught up in that remix world. I needed to pay rent.

I wasn’t really focused on option4 as an artist. I was touring and working on these remixes, which are fun, and I like all of them, but it wasn’t really stretching myself as an artist, per se.

I went on a hiatus and got in the studio. I started working on original records. We’re doing it all proper this time – shopping toplines, shopping labels. To me, it doesn’t matter if I have another record come out for the next six months. I know that when they come out, they will be released correctly with the proper PR. Hopefully, people appreciate them.

A lot of time and effort has gone into these records. They are ready to go. I’m not going to tour at all this summer. I’m going to play HARD Red Rocks this summer and Bisco, and that’s it. I’m going to spend the rest of the summer in the studio.

TMN: We’ve had the pleasure of hearing some of the new stuff. A lot of it feels like it has…a lot of soul. It has emotion. Why is that important to you when you go into recording something?

O4: Right now, my main thing is – I’m just trying to do what I enjoy. Last year, I was making all these big bassline records. They’re really fun to play out in the club, but I feel like everyone is doing that. That sound is rinsed, at the moment.

Last year, there was an explosion of big bass line driven house. Single melodies draped over single note basslines, going up and down. That was cool, and it was fun. But, somehow, that became “Deep House.”

Everything is going two different ways. You have what everyone is calling Deep House from the past couple of years. You have all these EDM kids who think EDM is stupid, which, we’ve been saying forever.

They feel that way now, all the sudden, so they want to go into this thing. So, the people who were making a little bit more mature beats at the time – they’re going different routes. One way is – they’re going a lot heavier, more monotonous, darker, repetitive beats. I want to go the other way. I love techno, but I want to make music that is emotive, but is still based upon the bass and the drums.


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Bart B More – Share Your Love [PREMIERE + Q&A]

Sat Nam Part Two
Bart B More
Share Your Love (Original Mix)

Bart B More is back with another EP, just one month after he released his Sam Nat Part One EP, and the first track is coming at you today. If you’re a long-time fan of this Netherlands-based producer/DJ, you know full and well he crafts sounds veiled in multiple different genres. Today’s release comes from the upcoming Sat Nam Part Two EP (coming April 20th), and it showcases the aforementioned much as ever. “Share Your Love,” boasts a laid-back, chilled electro sounds perfect to help you ease into your weekend.

We caught up with Mr. More to get some insight into this new tune and the rest of the EP. Check out what he had to say below:

TMN: Thanks for taking a moment to answer a few questions. First up, let’s talk about the track we’re premiering today, “Share Your Love.” It’s a bit of a departure from what people are used to. Can you talk to us about that a little bit?

BBM: It’s my pleasure, thank you guys for giving me the chance to premiere my new music! About ‘Share Your Love’ I can see how, from the outside, it might look as if it’s a bit of a departure from my usual sound. But the thing is I’ve always enjoyed making all kinds of different music, or different ‘genres’ if you will. What’s changed now is that I’ve finally gathered some courage to release it, even though it will probably confuse people. This is what my ‘SAT NAM’ project and my forthcoming LP is all about; breaking the barriers of sticking to one genre or sound just because it’s easier to package and brand, going ahead and really showing the other facets of myself as an artist.
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Mike Posner talks about his new style, fasting, and Wolverines [TMN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

Posneyyyyyy

We had the pleasure of catching a few songs from Mr. Posner at the Island Records brunch. We didn’t really know what to expect, after not hearing from him in quite some time. What ensued was nothing short of jaw-dropping, as this storied musician put on a show that was miles away from what we had known him for. Mike has completely shifted gears, harnessing a much more Americana-rich, folk-centric sound. It reminded us of Neil Young, Bob Seger, and other notable classics in American music. It was raw, real, and caught us completely off guard.

TMN: It’s been awhile since we’ve spoken to you, and in all honesty it’s been awhile since we’ve heard your name pop up. The one thing that we wanted to bring up after seeing your performance down at the brunch — you had this Neil Young/Americana/folk essence going on. Can you dive into that a little bit more and elaborate on where that’s coming from?

Mike Posner: Yeah, I think it just came from just getting tired of like pretending, you know? When I would do interviews like this in the past, like around my first album, I only wanted people to see the good parts of me, or what I thought were the good parts of me. So, like I’d be sitting in an interview like this and I’d be thinking in my head, “How do I make you and all your readers like me? How do I seem cool to them?” And it’s exhausting! It’s exhausting because you’re constantly in your mind, filtering what to allow people to see and what not to. It’s much easier to just let everyone see everything.

I’ve said this before: I defecate, I masturbate, if I’m lucky I’ll fornicate, just like everyone else. I guess in my soul that’s where it came from. Musically, I became like really fascinated by a lot of the artists you just named and also guys like Merle Haggard and Hank Williams Jr., that did what I just said, but in their music as well.

I figured out there were writers out there that really didn’t give a fuck. They really said the shit that they were scared to say. And, when  I saw that that lineage existed, and I also saw that no one was carrying  it on, it’s like the songs on the radio–a lot of which I’ve written–were not carrying on this lineage, I felt I had the skillset in order to do that, and I still do.
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[TMN Exclusive Interview] Get to Know: Kid Astray

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Kid Astray
It's Alright

Norwegian six-piece, Kid Astray, don’t represent a single genre but rather a distinct state of mind–one of youthful energy. Through a string of singles, the up ‘n coming band have shown us everything from indie rock on tracks like “No Easy Way Out” to Passion Pit-inspired electro pop like “Still Chasing Nothing.” Their latest single, “It’s Alright,” lands squarely in the center of that spectrum mixing airy guitar-driven verses with an undeniably catchy chorus powered by an addicting electronic melody. That juxtaposition is one they masterfully toy with, reimagining and transitioning between different styles all within one track. We had a chance to chat with a few members of Kid Astray–get to know them below and give their infectious latest single a spin above. Kid Astray’s debut album drops this June!

TMN: Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions! Starting from the beginning, can you tell us how you all first joined forces and the story behind the first song you all wrote together?

Jakob: No problem! We are currently stuck in our rehearsal space, preparing for our upcoming scandinavian tour, so it’s nice taking a short break. And talking about ourselves, haha.

We first met back in high school, where we were all studying music. Everyone but Even and myself knew each other from secondary school, and had already been playing together. Personally, I didn’t know anyone else on the school, but I really wanted to play in a band. I just played with anyone who wanted to play with me. I was the only drummer in our class, so Benjamin and Elizabeth didn’t really have many people to choose from, haha. We had our first rehearsal the same day we met. We played our first show after one week, playing cover songs. The first track we wrote was called ‘Eternal Gifts’ and was written in our rehearsal space at the time, Benjamin’s basement. That song is very different from what we do now, it’s pretty much a guitar based rock track without any synths. It’s still a bit nostalgic thinking about the song, since it was the track that earned us our first manager. Who knows, maybe we will use the core from the track again in the future!

TMN: Who were some of the artists you listened to growing up that you feel have inspired your sound?

Benjamin: Michael Jackson has been a huge inspiration! As a child I learned all the dances and songs by watching the videos and live DVDs. I have definitely brought elements from him into the KA sound. For example the pluck funk guitar. My whole family is a bunch of musicians, so it’s hard to name some specific artists. It’s everything from jazz and synthpop from the 80s to mums punkband! It’s all a part off our sound in a way.

TMN:Kid Astray has more members than most contemporary bands. How do you all approach studio time and how does that collaboration process work? Does it make things easier? more difficult?

Alex: There are definitely up-sides and down-sides of being six people. Traveling becomes more expensive, but also becomes more fun. Cause we’re six good friends, so we’re never bored! And even though we’re unusually many people, we’ve got more than enough to do on stage. We even have to be multi-instrumentalists to successfully get through the new album. The studio part of things works very well. We have our little mastermind Benjamin who starts on an idea, and then we all kinda get together and finish it off. I’m not really sure if things are simpler or more difficult, cause it’s the only way we know. But it definitely gives a lot of variety since so many of us have different musical preferences. Continue reading

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Pegboard Nerds Talk Monstercat, Collaborations, and Paul McCartney [TMN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

pegboard_nerds_hires

Recently, TMN was granted the privilege to talk to the whimsical personalities of Alexander Odden and Michael Parsberg, the dynamic duo behind Pegboard Nerds. Before kicking off two major releases with Monstercat–Bring The Madness: The Remixes EP and their feature on Monstercat’s 021 Perspective Compilation–we had a chance to sit down with them in NYC’s Webster Hall right before they threw down a massive set.

Excision & Pegboard Nerds
Bring The Madness (Ft. Mayor Apeshit)

TMN: How’s it feel to be playing at Webster Hall in NYC? This is your second time back right?

Alex: Being back at Webster Hall feels fuckin’ awesome. It’s kinda intimidating too you know because it’s such a stable trademark of New York so you gotta be on point and deliver.

Michael: Same.

Alex: (Laughs) You can’t say same!

TMN: Best response yet. How did you guys first get involved with Monstercat and how do you feel about the future of the label?

Michael: Well it started back in 2012, early, early twelve. A friend from Australia actually pitched one of our songs to Monstercat because they were needing a track for one of their compilations and it kinda just went on from there. They wanted one more track, one more track, one more track, and it went on, went on, went on and all the way up. Yeah, so that’s how we started.

Then you asked about the future of the label, right? It’s difficult to predict, but I think they have a good track record and a good following, and the philosophy of the label is really good. They’re not focusing on doing the next big Hardwell, Axwell, Made-well, Big-well, Aoki-well, Sleep-well, whatever. They just wanna do great new talent.

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Jack Garratt talks about SXSW, Blunderbuss, and Secrets of Beard Culture [EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

garratt

TMN: Hey Jack! Thank you for taking some time to speak with us. First up, let’s talk about the upcoming SXSW shows. Are you getting excited?

JG: Thank you very much. I’m so excited for it. I’ve known about that festival for so long and have always wanted to come and experience it, either as a fan or a musician. To be able to come out and do it as a musician is a real honor.

And, I’ve never been to Texas either, so I’m really looking forward to that.

TMN: How many showcases are you playing?

JG: I’m doing four.

TMN: You’re also doing a few shows in the states after that, correct?

JG: After SXSW, I’m doing two shows in New York. I’m doing support with Kate Tempest, which will be great. Then I’m doing Babies Alright with Communion, which is – for some strange reason – sold out.

On top of that, I’m flying out to LA for a show there, then after that I’m flying to San Francisco for a show, as well. They’ve all sold out as well, which I don’t understand. It doesn’t make any sense.

After that, I have a few weeks off, and I’m hopefully going to stay in LA and do some work. I’ll keep my head down, see what happens, and try to look out for what’s going to happen for the rest of the year.

After that, I head to Europe for, I guess, my proper European debut tour.

TMN: When can we expect a full US tour?

JG: I don’t know! We’re looking at the possibility of it, and trying to make sure we can come over and do some good shows at great venues. We’ll look to do a lot of US dates before the end of the year, and hopefully sooner than I think.

We will definitely, definitely be doing one before the end of the year though.
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