Gallant discusses his Prince tribute, Coachella, and Miyazaki films [EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

We first fell for Gallant’s mesmerizing voice all the way back in 2013, highlighting “Manhattan” in our first-ever Sunday Night Soul series. As the years went by, our adoration, along with many other’s, grew insurmountably, release-by-release.

In between two jaw-dropping performances at Coachella, and an appearance on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, we were able to link up with one of the most buzz-worthy artists in the scene.

TMN: Thanks for taking some time to meet with us. We’ve been fans for quite some time, so it’s an honor to sit down with you.

Gallant: Thank you for all the support for so many years. For real.

TMN: First off, let’s talk about tonight’s show, which is here in Denver, Colorado. Is this your first time to the Mile High City?

Gallant: No, actually, on my tour with Sufjan Stevens in the fall we stopped by Denver. It was one of the best crowds I’ve ever played for. It was a sit-down auditorium.

TMN: Paramount?

Gallant: Yep! It was awesome.

TMN: You’re coming off of a massive two-weekend performance at Coachella. What was that like for you?

Gallant: It was surreal. I felt like that was the biggest crowd I’ve ever played for. To have Seal out with me the first weekend and Jhené Aiko the second weekend was crazy. I felt really undeserving, but I was glad the crowd was responding to it.

Continue reading

Related items:

[TMN Exclusive Interview] TMN Talks ‘Life of Pause’, Time Traveling & More with Wild Nothing’s Jack Tatum

wild-nothing-press-header-image-940
Wild Nothing
TMN Exclusive Interview + A Woman's WIsdom (Official SIngle)

Few people are able to conjure up such a visceral response through their artistic medium as multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and chief architect behind one of the most lauded music projects over the last decade as has the L.A. via Blacksburg, VA (and a few cities in between) Wild Nothing frontman Jack Tatum. Clearly a pensive and grounded artiste, Tatum’s abundant knowledge of music pours throug Wild Nothing’s pop-structured, but genre-eschewing catalog. Tatum and Wild Nothing’s sound has always toyed between abstract and direct, which has resulted in some of the most velvety, lush indie-pop tunes we’ve ever exposed our cochlear cavities to.

Last week, jut ahead of the start of Wild Nothing’s current international tour, we had the chance to catch up with Jack and see what’s been going on since the release of Life of Pause and ahead of yet another hefty jaunt across the world. Check out our show preview for Wild Nothing’s upcoming Red Bull Sound Select Showcase in Denver this Saturday with Inner Oceans & Flaural at the Bluebird Theater, and be sure to read our entire transcript below.

The Music Ninja (TMN): First off, let’s just take a second to thank you for taking the time to let us pick your brain and answer a couple of questions.

JT: Absolutely.

TMN: I’ve been a very vocal Wild Nothing consumer since your excellent 2010 debut, Gemini, and this past February you added another worthy addition to the Wild Nothing long-player catalog with Life of Pause which was the follow-up to perhaps my favorite album in the last 5 years, Nocturne. So, another thanks is in order for consistently creating some of the most tasteful sounds we’ve consumed in the past decade. So let’s get into it.

Jack Tatum (JT): Wow, yeah, thank you, for those very kind words.

TMN: Obviously an artist can undergo quite a sea-change as far as personal tastes and aesthetic go in a 7-year period; and with every passing release it seems like another piece of your psyche gets revealed both aurally and stylistically. We know you’ve probably answered this more than a few times on this latest round of press obligations, but were there any significant events going on in your life that sparked this burst of creativity and some of the material on Life of Pause, or was the writing and recording process pretty similar compared to your other EP’s & LP’s?

JT: Ummm… I don’t know. Not necessarily. I don’t know, for the sake of not making myself sound too boring…

TMN: Hahaha not at all.

JT: I’ve never really been someone that wrote kind of in response to any one sort of scenario or event in my life. I guess you could kind of say with the first record (Gemini) it definitely was very much a response to the relationship I was in at the time. And it’s, you know, a very mood based record… A very sort… of I don’t know how exactly I would describe it. But, as I’ve continued to write, I’ve found that I don’t necessarily need a spark to start writing. I think especially as I’ve gotten older I have been equally writing from experience as I am just to write and out of interest, or just purely composition, or trying to achieve a certain kind of sound, or something like that. But, yeah, I put out Nocturne in 2012 and then had the Empty Estate EP in 2013. And that EP in a way was kind of a response to Nocturne, just because we had been touring on Nocturne for so long…

Continue reading

Related items:

Bayonne discusses his album, BBQ in Austin, and annoying house cats [TMN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

1176271_10151580440946828_37353023_n

When we first stumbled across Bayonne’s new album, we were absolutely mesmerized from start-to-finish. This one-man army brings the sensational ability to create an immersive listening experience, both on record and at his live shows, which is no easy feat. After being incapsulated for the better half of an hour, we decided to reach out and set up an interview with him ahead of his show at the Lost Lake in Denver, Colorado. Here’s what went down.

TMN: Hey Roger, welcome to the Mile High City. Is this your first time here?

B: I’ve played here a couple of times, back when I was doing a folk thing three years ago. I’ve been here a lot more than I’ve played here too.

TMN: You’re in the midst of a pretty lengthy tour, which included a few showcases down in Austin for SXSW. As an Austinite, what did those showcases mean to you?

B: It’s good to me because it’s when a lot of my friends and industry folks get to see me in my stomping grounds. And, I don’t have to travel. They’re bigger plays. They’re important plays. They’re comfortable plays. It’s bittersweet. It’s a lot of work and a pain in the ass, but it’s when everyone is in town.
’Appeals’

TMN: Also, as someone who calls Austin home, do you all have a secret celebration when SXSW is over so you can resume normal life?
Continue reading

Related items:

[TMN Exclusive Interview] Brooklyn’s The Golden Pony Sit Down With TMN To Riff On Favorite Drinks, Records and More

TGPpress
The Golden Pony
TMN Exclusive Interview + Don't Make Me Wait (Original Mix)

If you’ve been following our dance related posts over the years, we’re certain that you’ve come across house & disco benders, The Golden Pony, more than a few times. One of the most consistent production teams in dance music, TGP’s rise in the past year has been nothing short of meteoric, and after we’ve gotten the chance to get to know them over the past three years, it was high time we got to sit down with our favorite couple of Afro-Thunders and shoot the proverbial… well you know. Read our entire transcript below, and be sure to check out The Golden Pony’s latest original “Don’t Make Me Wait” out now on Enormous Tunes sub-label Enormous Chills on the player above.

The Music Ninja (TMN): First off, thanks so much Tim & Tom for taking the time out of your busy schedules to answer a few questions for The Music Ninja! We’ve been following you guys for YEARS since one of your first remixes, the Daft Punk “Doin’ It Right’ remix to be exact, first careened through our monitors. In the roughly three years since, The Golden Pony has evolved its sound constantly with every passing release including a handful of addictive originals. I know it’s a bit cliché, but could you guys give us theabbreviated story of how you went from a couple of lone-wolf afro-wielders to the formidable and nationally touring duo that you are today? Did you both have a background in music and have solo projects before TGP? Was there a serendipitous event that led to you guys deciding to go forward as a team?

TGP (Tom): Honestly by banging our head against every wall and wrong direction possible until something clicked! I have a background in classical music and was playing piano and writing (somewhat) intellectually interesting but unlistenable electronic music when I started going out to see acts like Gigamesh and Goldroom, and just got totally sucked into the culture and sound of the dance music world.

(TMN): How about we get into the actual music side of things. Clearly, The Golden Pony has come light years in terms of sonic nuance and building heavy grooves. What have been some of your tunes or remixes that you could mark as a step in the direction of you guys becoming one of the most sought after acts in the U.S. underground scene?Do you both ever go back and listen to some of your older stuff and maybe laugh or say, “what the hell were we doing there?”

TGP (Tom): I think that our remix for the Chainsmokers was a real turning point for us. It was the first time that I felt our sound really crystalized both in terms of being dancefloor-ready and musically interesting. That said, there’s absolutely some moments in our older tracks that I have no idea where we were coming from!

What are the three TGP tunes that you would play to someone who had never before heard you guys to try and capture your essence the best?

TGP (Tom): Snoop Dogg – “Drop It Like It’s Hot” (The Golden Pony Remix), “Die Inside Your Dance” Feat. Savior Adore and Simon & Garfunkel – “Sound Of Silence” (The Golden Pony Remix)

Continue reading

Related items:

Cracking The Code: Delving Into Blue Electronica & Understanding The Mystery Behind The Duo [TMN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

Blue Electronica

When we first introduced them as our resident artists for this month, we challenged you to see if you could crack The Code. That’s proven even more difficult with the release of their Blue Electronica EP, as the genre bending duo have continued to defy expectations since their emergence on the scene two years ago. The minute you think you’ve got them all figured out, the pair manage to throw a curveball your way that completely changes the way you view their music. We sat down with them recently to understand their recording process and the inspiration behind their music. See what they had to say about Blue Electronica, and listen to the entire project below. If you like what you hear, make sure you pre-order the album here.

’The Code – Launch’

TMN: It’s crazy to think that you’ve been able to amass such a large following without anyone learning your identity. These days there’s a lot of pressure for artists to open up and engage their fans via social media, but at the same time there’s been a growing contingent of reclusive artists trying to keep the focus exclusively on their music. Can you guys discuss some of the reasons why you decided to pursue this path, and some of the challenges that come along with it?

The Code: Well just like you said to focus on the music. At this stage nothing else is important. There are challenges in everything, so by choosing whatever path you should prepare and accept them, positive or negative.

’The Code – Electronica’

TMN: Like we said, no one’s quite been able to crack The Code just yet, and we’re interested in learning a bit about the significance behind your name: what does it mean to you and what does it represent?

The Code: It’s more what we are, not who we are. It represents the music, and our visual compass.

’The Code – Loving You (ft. P Reign)’

TMN: You guys have basically created your own signature sound, blending elements of electronica with R&B rhythms and hazy melodies. Can you talk to us a bit about your inspiration and how you came to develop this style?

The Code: Organically. Just creating what makes sense to the mood at the time, whether that be something energetic or chilled. Inspired by everything, not just music. In this day there is so much going on in the world its hard not to be inspired by everything.

’The Code – F**K’

TMN: You recently released your Blue Electronica EP, and the color seems to be a pervasive theme in both your music and artwork. What is it about the color blue that makes it so prominent in your aesthetic?

The Code: Blue is a calming color which can be dark, light, soothing and irate. It can also represent so many different things and the contrast between our interpretation of the color “blue” and “electronica” really fits.

’The Code – Azure’

TMN: In 2014 you introduced yourself to the world with the release of your debut mixtape, 1|11. This last project though, was much smaller in scope. Were there any changes in your approach when it came time to record Blue Electronica?

The Code: Not really, it all comes down to timing, both were made at different times in different moments.

’The Code – Mood (Find You)/Time’

TMN: There’s a lot of exciting talent emerging on the UK music scene lately. It seems like every time we turn our heads we find someone new. Are there any names you guys are keeping your eyes on, or anyone specific you’d like to collaborate with?

The Code: Anyone who wants to make music, any who is positive. If the time is right then anything is possible.

’The Code – Wolf (ft. KasFlow)’

TMN: Now that you have two projects under your belt, what else is on the horizon for The Code? Do you guys plan on doing any touring?

The Code: More of everything. It’s all been absolutely amazing so far.

’The Code – Breath’

TMN: Is there anything you’d like to say to someone who’s just hearing your music for the first time?

The Code: We appreciate your ears.

’The Code – Sedative’

TMN: The biggest misconception people have about the UK is ______

The Code: Not really sure, every area has stigma’s and stereotypes, good and bad.

’The Code – 16th Element’

TMN: If you could teach a robot to feel emotion through music, what album would you show them?

The Code: Daft Punk – Discovery

’The Code – IIIII’

TMN: If your music was a drug, how would it make people feel?

The Code: You’d have to ask the listeners that one.

Related items:

Brillz Enters The Dojo To Enlighten Us With Twonk & His History [TMN Interview]

Brillz Press

’Brillz & LAXX – WTPA (feat. Ms Williams)’

Brillz has lead his Twonk revolution as something that is more than just music. The out of this world lifestyle is something that fans have gravitated towards since its very conception. Now, Brillz is not only a leader in music but also in fashion and vaporizers with his unique Twonk Juice company. When Brillz gets into something, he goes balls-to-the-wall, which is why he’s been able to diversify his brand so well and see success in separate fields.

Recently, Brillz visited the dojo to give us a lesson on Twonk, talk a little about his history, and share what’s to come. Although he is wrapping up his Twonk Di Nation tour, Brillz had some extra time for some bonus questions. If you missed him on his tour, don’t worry – he has plans to get around throughout the rest of the year. You can also expect some more tunes to come out, but before we get a head of ourselves, let’s dive in to what Brillz had to say to us ninjas in the dojo.

TMN: What was the first instrument you picked up?

Brillz: A keyboard, it was a cheap garage sale Casio.

TMN: What was it like playing in bands prior to producing?

I miss it. It’s a lot more of a release, emotional and physical. I don’t really get that from producing, until it’s time to go on tour and perform.

TMN: What made you want to transition to a solo act, and why electronic music?

Brillz: I want to control my own destiny and create my own music on my own terms.
Continue reading

Related items:

[Festival Preview] Noise Pop Festival 2016–SF, 2/19-2/28

np2016-admat_fullNoise Pop 2016 is quickly approaching, beginning this week, February 19th, and ending nine days later on February 28th. Following San Francisco’s anointment as Super Bowl City on January 30th, the city was the center of the American sports world for nearly 2 weeks. Now, as those ceremonies are winding down, excitement regarding a more local-grown type of entertainment will be ratcheting up. Noise Pop has outdone itself in 2016, bringing one of the boldest and most impressive lineups in its prestigious history.

We were lucky enough to chat with Chad Heimann, the sole talent buyer for Noise Pop, so you’ll find some of what he had to say sprinkled through out this preview. Badges are still available for purchase here.

Continue reading

Related items: