Get To Know: Inpetto [TMN Exclusive Interview]

InpettoTMN

German production and DJ duo Inpetto have just released a sublime single on Dirty Soul, an imprint of renowned dance label Be Yourself Music. Titled “Never Too Late” and featuring vocalist Bryan Finlay, it allows the pair to show of their musicality and attention to detail in impressive style. We caught up with Inpetto to hear a little more about their take on deep house.

When did you first both sit down and make music together, and has it always been a part of your family?

Funnily no other (known) family member besides us has a musical background. It was around 1995 when we discovered our interest in making music and spent more and more of our money and time on it. We then did a couple of our own tracks that we sent out to some music labels. Finally in 1999,our first track was released – this was the start of our musical career.

What pulled you in about the Jerk & Bastard remix?

We love that remix, because it is a complete rework of our track just using the sax and the vocals combined with amazing sounds and driving beats. You have to love the kind of remixes where the remixer made a complete new track by using only the main part like the vocal or main melody of the original – like we always do.

When DJing at your live shows do you both take on separate roles, how does it work?

Well, because we are two people, the situation comes where you have different opinions. Someone has to have the last word on decisions, which is the older one. But that doesn’t happen very often!

Outside of electronic music, what do you find yourselves listening to and do you think this is apparent in your productions?

Actually we find ourselves listening to any genre, but not every genre is an inspiration for our tracks. We are big fans of alternative/indie rock like Daughter, Josè Gonzalez or London Grammar, which might play a role in how we use melodies in our tracks.

What do you have planned for the New Year, maybe an EP or even an album?

We have a couple of new, maybe surprising tracks signed in the first part of 2015. Stay tuned, but theres no album planned yet…

 

 

Dirty Soul Recordings
Inpetto Feat. Bryan Finlay – Never Too Late (Original Mix) [Out now]
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[SF Giveaway + Exclusive Interview] Buku & Willy Joy w/ Washed Out & Make It Funky, 12/5 @ 1015 Folsom

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Willy Joy & Buku
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Bass music is in a constant state of evolution with new sub-genres emerging each year. The artists who shine in an often over-crowded space, though, are those who manage to be unaffected by the current trends around them. Two producers who stand out in the realm of trap/dubstep/future tunes are Chicago’s Willy Joy and Philly’s Buku, who recently teamed up for the two-track Meaner & Leaner EP. While Willy brings a festival-ready, big-room sound, Buku provides a far-out bounce and funk making them a force to be reckoned with as a duo–both in the studio and on stage.

Buku and Willy Joy will be taking over the upstairs room at 1015 Folsom SF this Friday, December 5th, as part of their Meaner & Leaner Tour and we’re excited to be offering a couple VIP passes to the show, which will also feature sets from Washed Out and the DJs of Make It Funky SF among others. We also had a chance to catch up with Willy and Buku in advance of the show to chat a bit about their musical backgrounds, the tour life and how they first met. Enter the contest and enjoy the interview below–if you win, you’ll also get a meet & greet with Buku & Willy in case you’ve got any questions for them we haven’t already asked! Please keep in mind that all participants in this contest must be over the age of 21 and bring a valid ID to the venue to pick up their tickets. The winner will be notified via email Friday morning. Tickets are also still on sale and available for purchase here.



 

TMN:  Thanks for taking the time guys! First off, can you tell us a bit about how you first linked up? A Chief Keef show was involved, right?

Willy Joy: The first time we met was when we were booked on the same show in Washington, DC. It was in a big complex, and Chief Keef had a show in another room of the building. We kept sneaking away from our own show to go watch his. It was a definite bonding moment.

TMN: What caught your attention about each other’s sound?

Willy Joy: Buku has such a strong sonic identity – you can instantly tell if a track is his, and its such a dope, cohesive sound. I’m always drawn to people finding originality in established forms, and he’s carved out an entirely new lane for himself. That’s a long winded way of saying his tunes bang super hard.

Buku: I was and still am infatuated with the amount of energy Willy has in his music. From listening and playing together, I’ve learned quite a bit how to keep the party going wild. When he plays his tunes and special edits live, I usually have to grab hold of something concrete nearby.

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Catching up with Netsky at 1015 Folsom, SF 11/23 [TMN Exclusive Interview + Event Review]

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Netsky
Come Alive

Ambitious may be an understatement in describing Belgian producer Boris Daenen, better known as Netsky. By the age of 23, he had released two innovative drum ‘n bass albums showcasing his brilliant brand of liquid funk and placing himself in electronic music’s elite as part of Hospital Records. Taking advantage of the energetic percussion and wobbling bass of DnB, Netsky layers cross-genre melodies that draw influence from soul, jazz, hip-hop and funk making for an undeniably infectious sound and living up to the origins of his moniker.

In 2012, shortly before releasing his second album, Boris turned his attention towards performance assembling a band of talented musicians capable of keeping up with his fast-paced productions. Dubbed Netsky LIVE, the band consists of Netsky, keyboardist BABL, drummer Michael Schack, London’s Script MC and vocalist Billie. Not only is playing EDM live a tall feat from a technical perspective, but logistically it is a much more costly and risky endeavor. Nevertheless, Netsky, who could easily sell out shows worldwide as a solo DJ, takes this risk because he believes that it is the most powerful way to convey his music.

We caught Netsky LIVE at the intimate 1015 Folsom in San Francisco last weekend and it was without a doubt one of the most electrifying, energetic performances we have seen all year. The band seems fit for a stadium, which made seeing them in a smaller venue a special experience for the crowd whose feet were off the ground more often than not. With over two years of experience under their belt, every part of Netsky LIVE feels polished–Netsky takes on the overarching melodies, BABL absolutely shreds on the keyboard, Schnack keeps up with seemingly impossible breakbeats and Script gets the crowd amped as the musicians focus on their respective roles. Although Billie marvelously took on most of the vocals, at one point Boris even busted out the vocoder breaking his mostly quiet on-stage demeanor. We were honored to have the opportunity to sit down with Netsky, one of EDM’s most genuine stars, before the performance to talk about Netsky LIVE, his musical influences and his upcoming album. Check out the interview below and Netsky LIVE’s upcoming US tour dates here–it’s not a show you want to miss.

TMN: How’s the tour life treating you?

Netsky: It’s the first time with the band that we do a full 30-day tour with the bus, which is fucking mental. Because it means 30 days of no privacy and sleeping in a bunk. But it’s fucking amazing, I’ve got to say. You need the right team for it but once you have the right people for it, it’s amazing.

TMN: So, this is your third stop in the US after a couple shows in Canada. How’s the reception been so far? Anything different you’ve noticed in the crowd?

Netsky: Yeah, I think so. We started in Canada with Victoria and Vancouver and the day after we did Seattle. Even that was a bit of a change from Canada. It’s been fun. The crowd in Seattle was amazing and Portland was really good. Portland was a bit strange because they had to block off half the club for 21 over folks. It was funny because the left side was jumping the whole time with all the younger crowd and the right side was just getting wasted basically. It’s really cool to see the difference between those two.

TMN: Can you talk a bit about your musical background?

Netsky: I got into music at quite a young age. My dad is a massive record collector. He just loved showing me music that I hated back then. He just wanted to be the cool dad that showed me good music while I was listening to just pop music when I was young. After a while it worked because he got me into 70s, Motown and Marvin Gaye to 80s music and Prince and some reggae even. He just got me really interested in music. I started researching music and actually becoming a fan of bands. I started watching bands play. And then for some reason I started getting into electronic music, which was a fucking revelation. I loved the idea of being able to make music on your own on a computer. I was really obsessed with that when I was younger. I got into drum ’n bass then because I love the energy and how you can combine it with different sounds. I was listening to a lot of hip-hop back then and soul. Some producers would take those samples and make them into dance floor versions of them. I love that.
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[TMN Exclusive Interview] Chaz French talks Honesty in Hip-Hop, Inspiration and Overcoming Adversity

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Chaz French
Intro (prod. by Super Miles)

Authenticity has always played a particularly important role in hip-hop music for a variety of reasons. As an art form, rapping allows for condensed, concise and detailed lyrical expression often times putting artists in a position to reveal the depths of their personality or, in some cases, fabricate one altogether. The former approach lends itself to longevity and, maybe equally importantly, to differentiation because at the end of the day if an artist is truly being them self, no one can replicate the life experiences expressed through the music–offering a genuine connection with and impact on the fans.

Early last month, we came across Happy Belated, the debut EP from DMV emcee Chaz French. From start to finish, it may be one of the most honest records we’ve ever heard and, for Chaz, has really proven the perfect way to connect with, and continue to expand, his rapidly growing fan base. At only 23, he has already gone through a plethora of relatable life experiences from spending time homeless to having his first child to grappling with his inner demons and every last ounce of it is poured out in his music. Through its broad range of emotions and a pronounced duality, Happy Belated is not only meaningful but also powerful in its ability to inspire listeners to stay true to themselves, embrace their flaws and fuel success through adversity.

We had the absolute pleasure of chatting with Chaz French in-depth about a variety of topics ranging from his relationship with fellow rising star GoldLink to inspirations to religion and, just as we expected, he kept it 100% real. Read this deeply personal conversation and grab a free download of Happy Belated below.

Download: Chaz French – Happy Belated

TMN: You just came off tour with GoldLink in his supporting role for SBTRKT. How quickly did that all come together?

Chaz French: Me and GoldLink are like brothers. So, a lot of the tour shit that happened with us was organic. He’s always trying to set me up. We’ve got another record that we did on his now project that I don’t think I can speak on but we performed that record in his set. And it just escalated from there so once the SBTRKT tour happened, it was like, “Come on brother.” I did a couple dates. It was fun.

TMN: I know that you grew up on Gospel music around the house. When did you first get introduced to hip-hop?

Chaz: I always looked at music videos and stuff but really was just listening to hip-hop because that’s what everyone else was doing.

One day, I was watching MTV or BET and I saw the Kanye “All Falls Down” video and I was like “Woah, who is that?” I knew Kanye West, but that song did a lot for me. It was just so honest. That was the first artist that really got to me. Then, when I first heard Kid Cudi, I was like “Oh my god, this is so next level.” Not even the fact that you don’t know if he’s a rapper or a singer, or even just his all aesthetic. But I’m just really into honesty and it was the whole honest music thing. Those two really did it.
And of course, old Lil Wayne like Da Drought 3. Then, when I moved to Texas, I gravitated to the whole down south, chopped & screwed movement. It was just so dope to see as far as unity and their whole movement.

TMN: When did you first start writing raps?

Chaz: I was real young. I started writing raps just as a release. It started out as boredom. I was alway on punishment, I was always in trouble as a younger Chaz French. So, I would just be bored and always in my room. I did a talent show in 9th grade and the reaction was great. I was like, “I could take this, foreal.” Then, I started going through actual things—life hit me. I wasn’t always this honest rapper, this open guy. When life finally hit me, which was around 17 or 18, I feel like that’s when I grew more as a person, but I became a better artist as well. And I didn’t even know it. The bullshit I went through when I was 17,18,19, I didn’t know it was bettering me for now. Continue reading

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[TMN Exclusive Interview] Giraffage on his New EP, Musical Inspirations and The Based God

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San Francisco producer Charlie Yin, aka Giraffagepaints a radiant, colorful picture through his music. As a true student of R&B (seriously, he remixed The-Dream‘s Love/Hate album in its entirety), he has crafted an experimental electronic sound with the perfect sensibility towards the hits of the 2000s. His latest EP, No Reason, has a notable depth and cohesion that feels playful and supremely soothing, yet fully dance-floor ready. With its lush melodies and sonic plot twists, the project awakens an encompassing range of emotions and senses making for more than just an auditory experience. In a way, the music feels like a physical place with its ability to transport the listener to a whole new dimension–something we all need some times.

We were lucky enough to pick Charlie’s brain with a few questions about his new project, musical inspirations and dream collaborations among other topics. Enjoy this fun conversation and stream his phenomenal EP below. No Reason is out now via the always on-point Fool’s Gold Records and is available for purchase via iTunes. Giraffage is also in the midst of an international tour–check his upcoming dates here

Giraffage
Hello

TMN: When did you first start making music? And was there a particular album, song or artist who really inspired you at that time? 

Giraffage: I started making music near the beginning of high school. At the time, I was really into pop-punk and technical math rock stuff.

TMN: One of your original monikers was Robot Science. Do you see that as an alter-ego (like Caribou v. Daphni) or was that just the original iteration of Giraffage? 

Giraffage: I saw that as a learning experience more than an alter-ego, a lot of songs were just so unpolished and poorly mixed. However it did help me learn the ins and outs of releasing songs to an audience. Robot Science still has a special place in my heart.
Giraffage
Tell Me

TMN: The prevalence of soul & 90s-early 2000s R&B in the current electronic music landscape across sub-genres is hard to ignore. Both more broadly and for yourself, what is it about those eras of music that you think has brought them back to the forefront?

Giraffage: I think a lot of big producers nowadays were growing up listening to that era of 2000s r&b. As a result, the influence definitely carried through. For me personally, even though I love pop music nowadays, I think pop music back then had a lot more catchy hooks and overall more clever songwriting and technicality to it. People are starting to appreciate musicianship and that kind of stuff more than ever these days.
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[TMN Exclusive Interview] Talking G-House, Touring and Dirtybird with Shiba San

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The Key Ft Kelis (Shiba San Remix)

House music, which far outdates EDM as a genre, has a pretty fascinating history continuing to redefine and segment itself with each new generation of music. Withstanding the test of time effortlessly, House music today maintains relevancy by sticking to its core vision–keeping a dance floor steady grooving all night. Few artists represent that spirit better than Parisian DJ/producer, Shiba San, an emerging force partially responsible for the prevalence of the hip-hop influenced subgenre, G-House. Building each song around an enormous bassline, Shiba truly engineers for the club making his live sets infectiously danceable, often outperforming headliners at major festivals. Casual fans may know him best for his addicting hit single, “Okay,” which found its way into the sets of DJs literally in every corner of the world, but Shiba has also built a dedicated following on his Soundcloud almost purely through the posting of his flawless sets, which include endless unreleased originals and remixes. As of late, though, he’s been unleashing full versions of these potent tracks as he prepare to release an EP next year.

We had a chance to catch up with Lord Shiba, as we like to call him, about his inspirations, favorite places to perform and his future plans with newly joined label Dirtybird Records. Check out the interview below and enjoy some of Shiba’s gems, including his most recent remix above, through out the article. If you have a chance to catch him live (upcoming dates here), we’d highly recommend copping a ticket and bringing all the turn-up available.

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 I Remember (Shiba San remix)

TMN: First of all, thanks so much for taking to time to answer some questions! How’s the road life treating you?

Shiba San: Tough!!!!! It’s obviously nice to travel all over the world, meet new people and discover new music but I’m not getting a lot of sleep!

TMN: What is your first musical memory?

SS: Classical Piano.

TMN: You started DJing at a pretty young age in Paris. At that time, what kind of music were you spinning and how did coming up in that unique scene shape your sound?

SS: I started with Chicago House, then got into Hip Hop. I was nuts about scratching.

TMN: Artists such as yourself, Amine Edge & Dance are really bringing G-House to the masses. For those not as familiar, how would you describe the sound you guys are developing? And what is your relationship like with the Cuff artists?

SS: Amine Edge & Dance invented G-House. I was interested because the mix of hip hop with Chicago house sounds was getting me back to my roots/first love. I don’t really know the other artists from Cuff, I only released one EP on Cuff. Amine Edge & Dance are great people, they are friends, I love what they do and the way they are.

Shiba San
West Side Connexion (2014 Remake)

TMN: As a fan of both genres, I always love to see the ways hip-hop production styles trickle into electronic music whether it be in dubstep, trap or, in your case, G-House. Who are some hip-hop producers and artists, past and present, that have been particularly influential in your sound?

SS: I’m not sure they influenced me but DJ Premier and Pete Rock are my all time favorites. But I would say that DJ Mustard is the closest to the G-House sound.

TMN: On a similar note, if you had an opportunity to do a full project with a contemporary emcee or hip-hop producer, who would it be?

SS: Drake, Jay Z or Rick Ross.

Shiba San
Okay (Preview)

TMN: I’m sure you get a question about “Okay” in just about every interview, but it really does a great job of capturing your sound with its fat bass line and minimalistic big-house sound. What is your approach when you sit down to create a track?

SS: I don’t have a particular approach. I basically turn on the computer and play what goes through my mind. Sometimes it’s cool, sometimes it’s not. I make it rest for 2 days, if I find it interesting I keep it, if not I throw it away.

TMN: “Okay” dropped as part of the Dirtybird BBQ compilation tape. What’s your relationship like with the Dirtybird team and how did it come about?

SS: I met Claude (Von Stroke) in Paris when “OKAY” was already #1, it consolidated our relationship (laughs). I met the other artists from Dirtybird at the Hard Day 0f the Dead Festival. It was great, I’m a fan of most of them. Justin Martin is an influence for me. He came to the party in SF when I was playing, it was really special. I love this label and the artists from the label. I’m very proud to be part of it.
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[TMN Resident Artist] Fei-Fei talks about her music history, her debut album, and why her music is a lone wolf

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This month we have the wonderful electronic artist Fei-Fei taking over the Music Ninja website. She is one amazing musician and we are ecstatic to have her as the resident artist. I got a chance to sit down with her and talk a little about her music history, her current music endeavors, and what we can look forward to from her in the New Year.

TMN: Fei-Fei! Hey my dear First off, thank you so much for taking time to chat with us today!

FF: Thanks so much for having me!

TMN: Let’s take it back a bit here, talk to us a bit about musical background. Did you grow up in a musical household? Were either of your parents involved in anything musical? Siblings? You? Play in the school band or sing in any choirs?

FF: Yes music all day everyday. My Dad was a classical pianist, also played clarinet and oboe. My Mom used to be in the Chinese opera back in China. I tried suziki violin when I was 4 and hated it. Then few years later – I picked up classical piano and played for over 13 years. In grade school I was in the choir.

TMN: Who were some of your favorite artists to listen to back in middle school and high school? I feel a lot of kids really start to understand the music they like, or think is “cool”, when they are in middle school. College age is really where people find a taste. Tell us about your musical progression from middle school to college age.

FF: Everything! A ton of alternative, rnb and hip hop. Garbage, Nirvana, Mobb Deep, Smashing Pumpkins, NIN, Beastie Boys, Liz Phair, Jodeci, Bone Thugs N Harmony, Biggie, Tupac – and of course Wu-Tang.

TMN: Now when did you yourself start experimenting with electronic music? Tell us about the first time and what that felt like for you.

FF: I was at a friend’s house party and this amazing music was playing that I’ve never heard before. It was John Acquaviva & Richie Hawtins X-Mix-3 CD. After that I started going to underground parties by myself and just absolutely lost it. I decided at the first undeground I went to I had to be the person creating the music.

TMN: Now let’s talk a little bit about your sound, I mean I call your music electronic but it is really so much more than that. You have the ability to touch on so many genres and even non-genres. If you were to describe your own music to someone, how would you describe it?

FF: A crazy journey. All the ups, the downs and everything in between.

TMN: Where has been your favorite place to perform thus far? City and venue, and if they are different from another that’s fine.

FF: Its really hard to choose! Every place is different. It doesn’t matter to me whether it’s a 50k festival or an intimate 100 person club, it’s all about the vibe. Recently I played at 1015 SF with Purity Ring, Webster Hall (I love NYC), and Detroit always brings a dope underground vibe. Outside the states I’ve had a ton of fun in the UK – Nass Festival and Croatia – it was a super dirty warehouse by the ocean. And of course my own Feided parties in DTLA @ The Lash definitely go the hardest!

TMN: You have done some amazing remixes of some really great songs, for example your Banks remix, kind of obsessed with it. What do you listen for when you are considering doing a remix of someone’s work?

FF: I have to love the tune.

TMN: Now, this has kind of been a huge year from you, and everyone is taking notice. We have to say congratulations on the release of your debut album ‘Pretty Girls Don’t Hallucinate’, last time I looked it is already #15 on iTunes which is amazing. Talk to us about this album, what went into it, and how you feel putting it out there.

FF: It’s been so unreal. We hit #13 on the charts and was all over the iTunes front page with so many artists I look up to. I can’t even begin to describe how overwhelmed with the response so far. Everyday I think I’m going to wake up from this amazing dream. I can’t believe all the hard work is finally becoming a reality and it’s out! I’ve been a nervous mess the past month and especially the night before it dropped. Believe it or not I wasn’t even going to release any of it. I was going through some weird personal stuff in life and needed to get the emotions out – it was music I made for myself. It wasn’t until recently that I decided it was time to show the world a different side of me and see all the things I saw in my heard, all the emotions I went on during this amazing journey. The good, bad, wild and weird. It’s made me who I am today and I’m not afraid to show it.So this album is for everyone – all my friends, fans, my supporters and my haters. Everyone that’s ever come to a show, supported my music, taken a shot with me or been there for me in any way shape or form. Thank you for always believing in me.A big shoutout to everyone who’s worked with me on this project – you know who you are!

TMN: I can openly say, electronic music and dj-ing is a very male dominated industry. As a woman, talk to me about that and how that is for you. Also, what do you hope might come from more women in the industry and what would you say to up-and-coming female producers?

FF: I hate talking about it but it’s so inherent in our society as a whole. I say it over and over again, I’d rather be someone’s fave artist then someone’s fave female artist. Just making the distinction is extremely backwards and so many people don’t realize it. You don’t go around saying he’s my fav male singer or male lawyer etc. And I definitely don’t want to be treated any differently because I happen to be a woman. I avoid female themed branded events, stages, situations because that automatically separates the genders and works against what we’re trying to overcome. It’s not
about highlighting females it’s about gender equality and that affects both males and females. There are so many amazing and talented women paving their own paths right in the industry and that’s a good sign. Some are more vocal then the other, but my personally I like to keep my head down, do my own thing and be a role model for everyone – guys and girls. Wake up everyone. Talent is genderless. Advice for the ladies and the gents – you have to want it real bad and work super hard to earn your keep and overturn those stereotypes!

TMN: Talk to us about the upcoming year, which is quickly approaching, and what we can look for in 2015 from you?

FF: Promoting the album, tour and everything in between – it’s an ongoing process. It’s not like once the album dops – the work is done. I also have so many projects in the pipeline, but it’s definitely way too early to talk about that.

TMN: Fei it wouldn’t be an interview without a few fun questions for here we go, what is your favorite color lip-gloss?

FF: I’m so not a girly girl but…Clear shimmer with a hint of pink.

TMN: What is your favorite thing to mow down on? If no one is watching, name one food and/or meal that you go to town on.

FF: My Mom’s homemade dumplings at her restaurant – Dumpling Haus in my hometown. I won’t eat dumpling anywhere else because it just doesn’t even come close. But I’ll do that with or without people watching. I like to eat and I don’t care who knows it.

TMN: If you had to trade places with one person for a day, any person, female, male, who would it be and why?

FF: I wouldn’t dream of subjecting anyone else to the things that go on in my head.

TMN: Winter is quickly approaching, if you were stuck in the artic tundra and could only listen to one musical artist/group on repeat for a week straight, who would it be?

FF: Lately I’ve been OD’ing a lot on Caribou. Unreal that I’ve been sharing the charts with these guys and so many other artists that inspire me on the daily.

TMN: If your best friend called you tomorrow and said we are going on vacation to anywhere in the world that you want, where would you go?

FF: Spain. Costa Rica. Argentina. Tokyo. I can’t choose. Let’s just go around the world do it all.

TMN: Who is your musical man crush…and woman crush?

FF: Purity Ring. Also Grimes.

TMN: What is the weirdest thing a fan has ever said to you?

FF: You don’t want to know. I get a lot of weird messages. On the cool non-creeper side of things, someone recently described my album as an “underwater trap party”.

TMN: And finally the question we ask all artists, if your music were an animal, what animal would it be and why?

FF: A lone wolf. Bold, fierce and not afraid to take their own path.

TMN: Fei-Fei thank you so much again for taking the time to sit down with us! Have a great rest of the year and we cannot wait to see what 2015 has in store for you!

FF: Thank you I can’t wait!

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