Donkong Join Us In The Dojo With New EP [TMN Interview]

DONKONG
No Boy ft. Agent Lexie & Zorro (PREVIEW)

Distance is meaningless if you’re willing to make things work. Despite distance, Donkong was born. The duo comes out of Germany with unique dance-hall style influenced tracks that aren’t what you would expect to be coming out of Europe.

Donkong’s most recent project shares this sound. The No Boy EP features two singles, each with their own distinct sounds that show off the duo’s ability to be diverse. Upon listening to the EP, we had Donkong come join us in the dojo so we could get to know them and their recent EP a little bit better. Now, you get to enjoy all of these goodies for yoruself, so stream the title track preview while you read through our questions with Thomas and Joe.

TMN: Thanks for joining us, guys! Congratulations on your “No Boy” EP. How did the idea for this one come about?

THOMAS: Thank you very much. No Boy started as collaboration with our friend Zorro. He did percussion and I built the main synth that sounds so much like a brass sample that we could have saved some time on by just picking a brass sound. Nevertheless it was our first attempt to do Breakbeat. Same with Ammunition – we tried to combine a more traditional dancehall vibe with bass sounds. We’re quite experimental and always try to do things we haven’t done before.

TMN: You’re known for your innovative, genre-inclusive sound which seems to span a wide variety of musical influences. How did you both work to hone the “Donkong” sound?

THOMAS: We’re constantly discussing it and over the time there seem to be certain sounds that reappear. We still think the variety of what we do is too big. So we recently decided to do no more DNB… we have a DNB song coming after No Boy. What a coincidence.

TMN: Can you tell us a little about how you started making music together?

JOE: We live 500km apart from each other. The first time we got together in the studio and wrote “Jawz”, Thomas got sick. So he ended up on my couch and we Skyped every other hour to talk about the song and new ideas. Even though our first session was kind of a mess, Jawz turned out to be one of our best and original tunes so far.

TMN: What’s the scene like in Germany? Does the music go down a treat?

The scene is very small and that is also why we had a hard time playing gigs over the last years. Electro and Dubstep went down hill and suddenly all the cool parties disappeared. Then Hip-hop DJs started playing Trap, so no need for extra Trap parties. Germany is Techno land and everything that’s electronic but not Techno seems to be „not cool“ enough on the big scale. This seems to be slightly changing right now. Hopefully we and our friends can help with that.

TMN: So tell us a bit about how you found the process of making this body of work. Did you find that the inspiration flowed as soon as you hit the studio? Or was it tricky to pinpoint the specific sound for this one?

THOMAS: I guess it’s more about what we avoided to do with these songs. We don’t wanted them to have a typical club arrangement. Hopefully it makes a big difference for normal listeners. The sound is a combination of elements we also use in other songs, but we tend to build new sounds that act similar instead of re-using the old ones. Very often you start with an idea to make something specific and end up with a completely different song. Luckily these two ended up like what we had in mind, but it was a very long journey which took us over a year.

TMN: You’ve teamed up with Feral Is Kinky, Agent Lexie and Zorro for the EP. How did you all end up working together?

THOMAS: Like I said, „No Boy“ started with being in the studio with Zorro and having the basic idea for it. Then I met Lexie on one of Marten Hørgers‘ legendary BBQs, played her some beats and later on, while being pregnant, she recorded the vocals for it.

JOE: We haven’t met Feral in person yet, but she was working with some friends of us (Symbiz). Her style and voice was very unique, so we contacted her and asked her if she likes to work with us – sometimes it’s that easy.

TMN: You’re known for your excellent remixing skills (reworking tracks for the likes of Major Lazer, Krafty Kuts, Hudson Mohawke and TNGHT). If you could pick any artist, who would be top of your remix list?

Normally you want to remix a song that you think lacks something- or at least doesn’t fit your set. So it’s hard to pick an artist, because the people we admire tend to do very good songs, so our job gets a lot harder. Most of the time a remix that just takes the original to another tempo is quite boring. It probably would be something very different from our style, something with vocals preferably.

TMN: Can you tell us a fun fact about the Donkong project that fans may not necessarily have guessed?

The biggest fun fact is that we’re actually two people. Most of the time people think Donkong is one person.

TMN: What’s next for Donkong? Do you have any more musical treats for us in store this year?

There’s a lot to come. There will be some more free treats in the next weeks. A VIP mix of our single „Brilliant“ and a song with Marten Hørger. And we will bring more own original stuff as soon as possible. Stay tuned!

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Get To Know Needs No Sleep With New Track + Q&A [TMN Interview]

If you like house music, then you need to know Needs No Sleep. Just as his name says, he will keep you up all night with his energetic tracks that have received support from the likes of Afrojack, Dyro and Tommy Trash. Mitch Thomas, otherwise known as Needs No Sleep, is one of those producer’s on the brink of taking things to the next level, one that will put him in front of the biggest crowds available.

Needs No Sleep recently came out with a new single called “Who Can Do” before he came to the dojo to answer several questions about the project and himself. Over the course of our talk, Needs No Sleep covered topics like the new track, the scene in Australia and what’s to come next. Enjoy “Who Can Do” while you enlighten yourself with NNS and get ready for more goodies soon from this talented producer.

TMN: Thanks for joining us, Needs No Sleep! Congrats on your new track. How did the idea for this one come about?

NNS: I started with the vocal hook of the track, ‘Who Can Do What I Do’ which I recorded with my own vocal in my studio. I then played around and added some FX to it to have it sounding how it is now. After that I made the drop, and then a buildup and breakdown to go with it.

TMN: What would you say is the most ‘Needs No Sleep’ element of this track?

NNS: The heavy bassline groove is a clear indication that it’s a ‘Needs No Sleep’ track!

TMN: Can you tell us a little about how you began making music?

Having previously worked under another alias, I’ve been producing music for about 6 years. It’s given me the time to really hone my craft and sound which is part of the reason for the new ‘Needs No Sleep’ alias.

TMN: What’s the scene like in Aus? Does the music go down a treat?

NNS: The scene is great, as are the people in it. Great environment to nurture collaborations and receive feedback when needed

TMN: So tell us a bit about the process of making your work. Did you find that inspiration just flows as soon as you hit the studio?

NNS: One of the most important things that I live by is that you cannot force creativity, forced music will never be as good as music that comes naturally from an idea. Whenever I find I have inspiration for something, I will try and jump in the studio straight away to capture the idea that I have in my head. If that’s not possible then I will make a voice memo of it in my phone to then re visit it when I am in the studio later.

TMN: You’ve teamed up with Vicious Recordings in the past. How did you end up working with the team?

After the success of “Get Faded” and how well that was received, we decided to team up again for “Who Can Do.” I know the guys as we both live in the same city so we’ve had a great working relationship.

TMN: What’s the weirdest thing that’s happened to you while gigging?

NNS: You wouldn’t believe the half of it – also NSFW, haha

TMN: What’s next for Needs No Sleep?

NNS: After this release on Vicious I’m teaming up with Sebastian Bronk for a collaboration called “Trashed” which will be released on New York Label Uprise Music.

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[Pop] XY&O – One More Night (Lemonade) + Q&A

XY&O
One More Night (Lemonade)

There are a lot of songwriters out there and a lot of them write for other people. That was the original plan for XY&O, but after they came up with their signature sound, they couldn’t pass along the goods to other people to perform. They took the project by the horns and didn’t look back.

After launching in 2015, they’ve come out with several releases, the latest being “One More Night (Lemonade)” that comes with their second EP announcement. If you’re just getting familiarized with the trio, this track is a good place to start and if you’re already familiar, well then you know just how talented these three are. Either way, stream the single today as you read through the interview we had with XY&0 in the dojo!

TMN: Can you tell us more about how XY&O came about? How did you three meet each other?

Me and Tudor met at a recording studio in Cardiff Bay. I was working there and Tudor came in to record some tracks. We decided pretty much then and there to try write some songs together. I knew that Nick (guitar) from a band he was in. He had a pretty unique style even then at 17 or whatever he was, so we roped him in.

TMN: Tell us more about Cardiff! How has your hometown influenced your sound?

Cardiff, like most capital cities is a pretty diverse, dynamic and exciting place. Our music is often described as summery, beachy, chilled but Cardiff really is neither of those things particularly. Perhaps the fact that we started working out a small room in Bay area of Cardiff influenced our musics genesis. We spent a lot of time between Cardiff Bay, Penarth and Barry when we wrote our first few songs. They’re all coastal so maybe the beach just unconsciously crept in.

TMN: You guys each come from different music backgrounds. How have your tastes molded into the current sound you have?

Yeah, we all have very different musical backgrounds. Pop music (as broad as that is) is probably the common ground between us so was the natural landing spot for our creativity. Personally, my taste are pretty diverse, my favorite artists are people like John Martyn, Prince and bands like The Cure, Kings of Leon. You probably don’t hear much of that in our music though. Nick is the best instrumentalist among us, he has a wide range too but he’s into more technical music, soul, jazz etc. Tudor is the most millennial for sure. He loves a club banger.

TMN: What was the inspiration behind “One More Night (Lemonade)?”

One More Night is written about the allure of the ‘perceived’ darker side of professional life (or life in general). Why does Louis Theroux make documentaries on sex workers and porn stars? People want to know what the real people are like behind those professions. One More Night is same thing. It’s like a Louis Theroux documentary, but far less entertaining.

TMN: Any tour plans around your ‘Powder Rooms’ EP release this year?

Yeah we do. Hopefully after the summer.

TMN: Ending on a fun note, name your dream collaboration!

Skip: most of mine are sadly dead. It would have been Prince.
Nick: At the minute maybe Anderson .Paak, that could be very interesting

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Get To Know The Mad Beat Scientist Jack Squire [TMN Interview]

Jack Squire
Creatures

Often times when producers preach that they’re doing something special, they aren’t really. Jack Squire is someone who is in the lab cooking up some hot concoctions that are sure to change the game. There are already several producers fusing classical music with dance, but Jack is one of the notable ones you’ll need on your radar.

Recently, Jack came out with his fiery electro tune “Creatures” that showcases just the style he is going for, however that doesn’t mean he can’t take his style into new sonic territories. With “Creatures” we get a single that moves from an old-school dance sound to a cinematic break that finally leads us into some energetic bass. It has come just in time for festival season, so if you want your set or playlist to stick out, you’re going to want this in there. We brought Jack Squire into the dojo to answer a few questions so that all of us could get a glimpse into the mind of such an intriguing producer.

TMN: Where did the name Jack Squire come from?

JS: It’s actually my name! Squire is my middle name.

TMN: What was the inspiration behind “Creatures”; and how do you tap in creatively to the bass sound that fits you?

JS: I wanted to do something that felt very cinematic, and I’ve always loved the sound of string ensembles. They're so full of emotion. For the drop, I wound up using a lot of random sound effects for little fills. Gunshots, a woman shrieking, chainsaws, even the famous Wilhelm scream. It all makes it sound like the song is playing during a monster movie montage. Hence the name “Creatures”.

TMN: Who do you look to artist-wise if you are lacking inspiration in the moment?

JS: Joyryde and Blackgummy. Joyryde’s music is on a whole other level. I absolutely love it. Blackgummy and I actually have a studio together, and he is always doing some wild stuff. I don’t think anyone uses effects (whooshs, sweeps, little noises, subtle changeups, etc) as well as he does in his tracks. There’s lots of producers out there doing really interesting things across all genres, it really depends on my mood and what I’m doing. I think Pixel Terror’s remix of ARMNHMR’s song ‘Wings’ is one of the most interesting bass heavy tracks I’ve heard.

TMN: What do you wish you knew 2 years ago as a musician that you hope other young producers will learn now?

There’s no right or wrong way to make music. Use loops, use presets, make every sound from scratch, record the sound of stuff around your house, do whatever the hell you want. At the end of the day, if it sounds good, it sounds good.

TMN: What is your dream show?

JS: Honestly, in my experience, as long as the dance floor is packed and everyone is feeling what I’m playing, it doesn’t matter if its 50 people, 500, or more. It always feels amazing. But I definitely dream of doing some incredible stuff live eventually. I would love to bring out live instrumentalists and vocalists to big shows in the future, and do some live performance shows with incredible visuals. That’s still quite a ways off for me, though!

TMN: What is the Jack Squire plan for 2017?

JS: Lots and lots of new music! I’ve got tons of solo stuff I’m going to release this year, and have a few collabs in the works as well. You can definitely expect at least one new song every month from me.

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Delving Into The Mind Behind JNTHN STEIN’s “Changes” EP [TMN Interview]

JNTHN STEIN
Changes EP

Ableton Push spokesperson and Team Supreme co-founder JNTHN STEIN recently released his latest EP Changes, also remixed by fellow Team Supreme artists Mr. Carmack, Djemba Djemba, and Penthouse Penthouse, featuring a melding symphony of electric guitar, bass riffs, innovative production, synths, delicate jazz piano and vocals. His abilities created a layering masterpiece that exposes the intimate workings behind a mind capable of exposing sounds and textures that we didn’t even know existed. We got the chance to talk to Stein more about the EP and the beginnings of his musical career, check out his detailed insight below and be sure to stream or download here.

TMN: You attended the Manhattan School of Music which is awesome, so many great producers have come out of that school, before this though when did you pick up your first instrument and which one was it?

JNTHN STEIN: My first instrument was actually clarinet, and I started playing it when I was 12 so as to meet my middle school band requirement at the time. However, the first instrument that began my obsessive and passionate relationship with music was the electric bass, which I started at age 14.

TMN: Were you self taught or given lessons when you first started?

JS: I taught myself as much as I could for about a year before taking instruction. I enjoyed learning my favorite rock basslines at the time by listening to records and just being patient. I’m incredibly grateful for all my time spent with great teachers however, they kept me focused on the most universal and versatile applications of music through the respective instrument, and on the path of taking care of my body most importantly. Musical instruments can be very physical, and the most valuable thing I’ve taken from them was playing with as little labor and ergonomic stress as possible, so that I can keep playing them for the rest of my life with comfort and happiness.

TMN: How do you think MSM shaped you into the producer you are today?

JS: My studies and experiences at MSM gave me a broad vantage point on the history and trajectory of music over the span of 1000 years, and helped me understand that, not only is change and evolution incredibly important to the development of art and the society it reflects, but simply inevitable. Everything that has been, from when man first struck a rock with a stick and called it a drum to the hyper-eclectic world of digital/electronic recorded music of today, has been one linear trajectory, and it will keep changing drastically for all of our time. No matter how much tradition and pretense you study and observe, the end result always points to a path of perpetual and sometimes chaotically arbitrary forward progress and constant cultural imaginative innovation, based on understanding the established rules, and then breaking all of them.

TMN: At what point in your studies did you think to start branching out from classical music?

JS: I had always been pretty all over the place aesthetically since I started making music, from growing up in the hiphop/funk-rich city of Oakland to my parents taking me to see the living jazz greats play live whenever possible. However, while at MSM I was taking the seemingly tried-and-true path of the orchestral musician, despite me knowing that it would be at the expense of my creativity and spiritual freedom deep in my heart. By my third year in school, I had reached a personal unprecedented cynicism on the musician’s life and morbidity of life altogether. I felt that, despite all my efforts and passion, my voice was so small and would never be heard from this small bubble inside the big picture of music, let alone would I ever get to say what I truly wished to express. So, I started to casually make beats on Garage Band for the sake of escapism, and then Ableton upon getting my first cracked copy. It didn’t take long after for me to see the limitless creative possibilities with this medium, and connect the dots to its already established and blooming accessibility. That summer I realized that this would change everything, for myself and my music making, and for music as a whole.

TMN: You play each instrument yourself in your EP – Which ones can listeners find if they listen closely? Any hidden ones?

JS: It’s no secret that I use a lot of organ and rhodes in my music. I suppose the catch is, both of these are instruments I designed in Ableton, and perform on Push, along with the rest of the EP’s synth and drum work. I also use a lot of guitar, and the fun fact there is that all of these parts are played on the higher strings of my 7 string bass.

TMN: What was your introduction to the electronic side of music?

JS: Sophomore year at MSM, my ears started to wander to the nuances of programmed drum loops, particularly J Dilla. There was a soothing constance and cyclic rigidity, yet the feel was still so dangly and reclined while simultaneously being snappy and forward-pushing, it was an awesome combination to me that created a bounce that swung your body back and forth like a gelatinous stick figure. From here I grew to appreciate the production of popular music such as Timbaland and Pharrell through their simple yet sultry, smooth and seductive use of harmony, and soon after the brilliant timbral range of synthesizers through artists like Kaskade and Skrillex, and the raw boundless textural atmospheric possibilities through Flying Lotus and Toro Y Moi.

TMN: You worked closely with Ableton Push as a spokesperson, which resulted in your Berlin EP – how did that collaboration come about and what was the best part about it?

JS: I was first introduced to Push the summer of 2013, and immediately connected with it because of its guitar/bass-inspired keyboard layout. I took the risk of using it in a show with Team Supreme in LA, and there happened to be an Ableton artist rep in the audience whom I’ve become great friends with and was nice enough to offer me a Push in exchange for feedback. The next year and a half was spent getting to know Push as closely as possible through my music production. Finally after this period of study, I had the pleasure of meeting the creator of Push itself, and had the chance to show him how I used it. Our afternoon together ended with him inviting me to film a video of me making music with Push for Ableton. The video was filmed in Berlin some time later, for which we did three takes of me making a song from scratch for two hours each. The third take became the video they published, but additionally I thought it would be fun to release all three of the songs created as an EP and simply name it after where it was made, a city that I loved for its raw outspoken stand on social and artistic freedom, good coffee and food.

TMN: Do you think producers that have classical training or are able to play an instrument have an advantage over producers who don’t? Why or why not?

JS: The most wild imaginative sounds I’ve heard have come from some of my friends who’ve never touched a physical instrument before. The new instrument is the laptop and the DAW, and it already has its own virtuosos. But, while you can be an incredible beatmaker with this instrument and knowledge alone, to truly tap into the whole cultural amalgam that has been built from day one and led to the musical idioms we have today and project the ones to come and use this to try and make the songs that might change the world for the better, I like to think it helps to have experienced how music was made before the computer. While timbre is very much at the front of recorded music today, it functions on top of the foundation of rhythm, melody, harmony, and the iconic nostalgia-inducing sounds of strings, horns, drums, guitars, keyboards and piano of older times, that will never ever fade and become irrelevant because of how acoustically unique and imprinting they are. Nothing excludes anything else, I’d like to see how far we can go with computers, instruments, and of course humans working together endlessly.

TMN: As a member of the Team Supreme collective, how does it feel to have such amazing artists that you know personally remixing your EP?

There’s truly nothing better than your best friends being awesome musicians that inspire and awe you with their diversity and unique imagination in the downtime of you goonin and just being perpetual kids with them.

TMN: Where did your inspiration and ideas for your Changes EP come from? Are you someone that comes up with melodies in your head before you lay them down? Do they come from sounds you hear, or certain influences etc…?

JS: I consider myself an empty jar when the music process begins, the moment I form preconceptions I become anxious and feel restricted. I like to push record, turn Push on or put my bass in my lap, and just follow wherever my fingers take me in real time, and then edit it all into cohesiveness afterwards. I suppose the sounds of my muscle memory and subconscious come from everything I’ve ever heard, jumbled into a tasty music stew in my brain.

TMN: Lastly, what can we expect from you in the future, maybe an album or a tour?

JS: You can absolutely expect more EP’s as well as an album, a North-American tour starting in mid April, more music to come for a long long time, and most importantly, you can expect me to always go through ‘Changes’ 😉

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Get A Behind The Scenes Look Into What Makes No Way Back [TMN Interview]

NOWAYBACK
Minute ft Sophia Black

After the release of “Minute” on Enhanced Music, we wanted to get together with its creator, No Way Back, to see just what makes the Los Angeles producer tick. We’re loving the soothing vibes of his work and had to get a behind the scenes look at where he has come from.

No Way Back is one producer you need to know if you don’t already. Anthony Pisano is doing things right bringing great music to the table with a signature style that will identify him for years to come if he keeps up with it. AFter only being on the scene for around a year, he’s managed to make a lot of headway, so we wanted to give you a look behind the project with the current interview. While you read through our concise Q&A, listen to his the collaboration with Sophia Black on “Minute.”

TMN: We love your mix of 90’s influenced R&B and house! How did your sound come about?

NWB: I grew up listening to R&B, soul, and hip-hop in the 90’s. When I first discovered Daft Punk it all came together for me. I realized that blending feel good R&B/soul elements with dance music was my sound.

TMN: What are some R&B acts that have influenced your sound?

NWB: The Weeknd, TLC, Aaliyah, Cashmere Cat, Kaytranada, and Miguel are a few that influence my sound.

TMN: When you’re not producing or touring, what are you up to?

I like to work out, go on hikes and do yoga when I’m not in the studio. I’m definitely a foodie so I love trying out different restaurants. I live in Los Angeles so there’s always so many good spots to try out.

TMN: Any new releases coming up you’d like to tell us about?

NWB: I just released my new single called “Minute” featuring Sophia Black a few weeks ago. I have a lot of music finished and ready to go so it’s about figuring out the next release date. If I had to guess I would say probably April or May. The plan is to put out another single followed by an EP so I’m currently working on that right now.

TMN: Any acts you’re excited to check out during Miami Music Week?

NWB: MMW is always an inspiring week for me. I always go back to the studio after that week with so many new ideas. I’m definitely excited to see Magician. I haven’t seen many line ups yet but I get inspiration from so many different genres and artists right now I’m just excited for the whole week.

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Dive Into The Mind Behind Two of Norway’s Biggest Hits, Julie Bergan [TMN Interview]

Julie Bergan is what pop music needs, even if it doesn’t know it yet. From her home in Norway, Julie has been the creative mind behind two of the country’s biggest hits. First came “Arigato” then “Blackout,” both of which share a similar future pop sound that is steadily becoming a go to style for many artists. The only thing is, Julie is doing everything right.

These two songs have went viral on Spotify, and each have their own music video that have seduced fans from all around the world. With multi-million plays each, Julie is turning heads in a big way. She’s making all the moves she needs to pave the way to becoming one of music’s biggest stars.

We sat down recently with Julie to get a sense of where she’s come from and where she’s going. Part of where she’s going is – hopefully – everywhere, as she just unveiled her new live show. It’s already taking Europe by storm and we’d like to see her make her way across the pond. Enjoy the amazing music video for her single “Blackout” before diving into our conversation with one of music’s brightest talents.

TMN: “Arigato” was a huge moment for you in 2016. Tell us a bit about your breakthrough single – did you expect the track to leave as big of a footprint as it did?

JB: I was blown away by the way it was received. The whole track was based on a conversation I had with a friend about her over controlling boyfriend. I think everyone has the right to take their own risks and live life without someone trying to bubble wrap them. Relationships can be a place where this happens the most, so ‘Arigato’ was very much a track about liberating yourself from a safe and controlled environment. To see it stream and gain as much love as it did was really touching.

TMN: “Blackout” marked what seemed to be another very personal single from you. What can you tell us about the inspirations behind the single? Was it at all nerve-wracking to follow-up “Arigato”?

JB: “Blackout” is very much about being stuck in your own head and the mental barriers that appear in life. The idea was having these little “Blackout” moments are the only way to escape and find yourself. The video very much echoed this idea and I was very proud of how the track came out. I tried not to think of it too much as just a ‘follow-up’ to “Arigato.” I want every track to stand on its own feet and speak for me as an artist. The response has been great and I feel very positive about kick-starting 2017 with the single.

TMN: Where do you find the most inspiration from musically?

Real life is definitely one of the biggest influences on my music. Part of the blessing in making music is finding a way to translate human emotions into relatable art or memories. I am lucky because I get to see and be part of the whole process, from the creation of the music to the performance. All of my material to date has been inspired by real situations and feelings and I like to think that people can relate because of that.

TMN: You’ve recently been showcasing the live element of your project. How important was it from the start that your music could be re-produced and performed live?

JB: It has always been very important. I think listening to the records you can get an idea for my energy, but the show is where we can really bring it to life. I have been dancing since I was a child, so to be able to incorporate that to music I have made myself is of course a really fun thing. I am super lucky to have an amazing band behind me and the more we are playing the more people are seeing the fuller picture of what my music is about. I get to be involved in every aspect of it creatively, from the sets to the design, so it is a very personal and important side of the music for me.

TMN: What do you consider to have been the biggest challenge or obstacle to you within your career so far?

JB: The blessing and curse of anything involving creativity is that it’s easy to overthink. You can become obsessed or overprotective of certain aspects of a song or yourself and then when this happens it is hard to get out of your own head or make decisions on what should be the solution. With time I think I have been able to become really comfortable with my style and sound, as well as what I want to stand for as an artist.

TMN: You started 2017 on huge form with ‘Blackout,’ what can we be expecting for the year ahead?

JB: New music!! We are doing a lot of great shows around Europe off the back of “Blackout,” but there is plenty more to come for the rest of the year and I am very excited to show it off soon.

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