Get To Know FLTHY ANMLZ Before Everyone Else Does [TMN Interview + Mix]

FLTHY ANMŁZ
FLTHY Guest Mix

Bass music is here to stay. The ever-evolving blanket genre has been expanding into new territories for as long as we can remember. There are so many talented new artists coming to the fold, but we’ve got our eyes and ears on FLTHY ANMLZ.

To help you get familiar, we brought these bass-loving boys into the dojo to answer some questions. On top of that, they’ve brought an exclusive mix to the table for everyone to enjoy. With it we get thirty minutes of jaw-dropping bass. Some of that is made up by tracks from FLTHY ANMLZ themselves. Let’s get down to business and see what FLTHY ANMLZ is all about and where they came from.

TMN: What got you each into music? How did you end up together as FLTHY ANMLZ?

FA: We’ve been really good friends since 7th grade and after High School we both really got into DJing and going to Electronic Music Shows. We were so hooked on the scene that we had to take the next step and try our hands at producing our own stuff. We both did our own thing for a little while but as time went on we discovered we had very similar tastes and started producing a lot together. Soon after we started playing together and eventually we just decided that two heads are better than one and why not produce and DJ together.

TMN: How did you come up with your name?

FA: A lot of our very first remixes, flips, etc. had samples from the original Home Alone movie. The part where Kevin uses the old movie to talk to the pizza guy. We sampled the part where it says, “keep the change ya filthy animal!” and used it numerous times in different works. We liked it so much and it fit our style so well we decided to name our project after it.. FLTHY ANMLZ was born.

TMN: If you could sum up your sound in 3 words, what would they be?

FA: Filthy Hybrid Bass

TMN: If you could collaborate with any artists, who would you pick?

There’s so many amazing artists we’d love to work with. But just to name a few: LUMBERJVCK, JPhlepz, BTSM, WOOLYMAMMOTH, Holly, G JONES, and Mr. Carmack.

TMN: Where do you see bass music headed and how do you see yourselves fitting into that progression?

FA: The cool thing about bass music sound is that its always evolving. As far as sub genre’s go, what’s big now is pretty much here to stay for a long time to come. There’s some artists out there that are really doing there own thing as far as sound design goes and we really hope to carve out our own niche in that some day.

TMN: Let’s get more technical on this next one, what’s your go to plug-in and why?

FA: Serum is the go to right now. You can create anything from scratch in there or you can go to town on an existing audio clip, preset, etc. There’s still so much to learn about it too so thats pretty awesome that theres room to improve on our use of it.

TMN: What can we expect from FLTHY ANMLZ for the rest of 2017?

FA: Hopefully we can establish releases with some really solid labels by the end of the year and keep building on the brand we’ve started. That is our major goal right now. You can definitely be expecting more music from us thats for certain. We’re also working on booking some big shows so we can rinse out some of our unreleased arsenal we’ve been sitting on.

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Kompany & G-Rex Drop Collab & 10 Production Tips [TMN Interview]

Kompany & G-REX
Downfall

If you’ve got the sauce, there should be no downfall. The only exception to this comes from Kompany and G-Rex whose newest single “Downfall” has been released as a free download. Not only have they delivered a whopping bass beast, but they entered the dojo for a little something extra.

As two of bass music’s most promising up and comers, they’ve put in the time and diligence to get where they are today. Their rise can be attributed to amazing works like “Downfall” but those tracks come from honing in the skills at home or in the studio. That’s why we sat down with them to get five production tips from each of the boys. While you enjoy their boisterous hit, read through their advice and get to work on your next hit!

Kompany:
1. Find your sound. Experiment with your own style of synthesis or resampling techniques and really drive that home so you have something recognizable to your songs.

2. Take time to dial in your drums. Even one small adjustment to your hi-hats/kick and snare can change the energy of your entire track.

3. Find the weakest point in your production and spend a whole entire month or so focusing strictly on that.

4. Be patient with your releases! Build a catalog of impressive music to pitch to your favorite labels. Make it all cohesive if possible.

5. Put in the hours. There are no shortcuts and if you put in every free hour you have into production you will grow at an exceptionally fast rate.

G-Rex:
1. Don’t Sleep on your DAWs native plugin. Having tons and tons of VSTs is awesome but most of the time the presets in your DAWs native plugins can do the same thing. Just become aware of what they all do and how they can be used.

2. Make your own sample pack to use. Making your own sample pack with your go-to samples will speed up your work flow and help you continue to build on your sound.

3. Keep your sample library organized. This will also help when with workflow and speed of production. Proper labeling will help with searching in your Daw when your looking for that perfect sample.

4. Experiment. There really is no rules when it comes to producing. Never box yourself in. The more time you invest experimenting the more you will learn about your production style and will eventually fall into production routines that will end up leading to your “sound.”

5. Have your palette ready going into writing. I have sat down countless times excited to write something new and just haven’t known where to start or end up with just a loop. It is a lot easier to start with a painters perspective. get some samples, presets, and vocal ideas that fit the vibe/idea of what you want to write, throw them in your DAW, and start arranging them into a full song.

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Point Blank Offers Home Studio Set Up Tips With Video & Playlist [Dojo Takeover]

Point Blank Music School is one of the best places for music producers to get a leg up. They’ve got three schools spanning the globe, as well as online classes/courses that can be taken from the comfort of your own home. Not only that, but they offer some great free videos for all sorts of tricks.

The latest tricks they shared had to do with one of the most important things for a producer: setting up their home studio. Not only has Point Blank entered the dojo to help you with your home studio, but they got their hands on our Dojo Takeover Spotify playlist to give you some great music to set up your studio to. Check the tips, check the songs and make sure to hit up Point Blank for any of your producer needs.

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Adam Tell Talks Getting Into Music & New Falsework EP [TMN Interview]

I don’t know how Adam Tell gets it all done, but he does. He’s got a day job, but when he’s not 9-to-5-ing he’s working on his passion, music. That most recently has brought his EP called Falsework to fruition, complete with seven tracks total. Not only does Adam tell deliver dynamic productions, but he lends his light-hearted voice to the project as well.

It’s not easy to do everything yourself, but Adam pulls it off just fine. Throughout the project he gives listeners a variety of sounds to immerse themselves in, while nailing each vocal he performs. He’s an all in one package that has a great future ahead of him if he keeps up the great work that he’s already accomplished, especially with Falsework.

Not only has Adam Tell entered the dojo with his EP, but he has answered a few questions we had. In taking some time with us, he shines light on Falsework, as well as his journey into music. Get the inside scoop on this unique musician straight from the source, Adam himself. Enjoy his EP while you read through our interview with him.

’Foreground’
’Opposites Attack!’
’Roll The Tape’
’Headway’
’Falsework’
’Full Recovery’
’Parallel’

TMN: Was music a large part of your childhood?

Oh yes! Some of my earliest memories were sitting on the bench of my parents’ baby grand, or playing with the rhythm machine on our electronic keyboard. Over the years, my family accumulated instruments, like a C3 organ, accordion, drum set, and guitars. My brother is the guitar player, and my dad plays piano, so I’d take the drums and the three of us would jam all the time! When we weren’t jamming together, I’d be on our home computer recording music on Garageband. On top of that, I was lucky enough to take piano, saxophone, and voice lessons for long periods of time. I had a really rounded musical childhood that exposed me to different styles of music and different ways to create it. I was a lucky kid!

TMN: Did you have any “a-ha” moment where you realized you loved and wanted to pursue music?

Not really. Some bright moments in high school stand out, but it was mostly just the sheer volume and variety of musical memories that pushed me towards it. I’ve always been doing it, and I genuinely can’t imagine not pursuing it in some fashion for the rest of my life.

TMN: When did you get comfortable putting your music out there and how to did you get past that initial phase?

I’ve been “releasing” music basically since I started producing/songwriting back in 2006, but by releasing, I mean handing out burnt CDs to my friends. I probably finished around 100-150 songs in the seven years before I started working on my first official release/album,, Past the Hypothetical. Back then, it was very casual and unacademic. Lots of transcribing and recording Frank Sinatra arrangements (yes, the whole big band), recording covers of my favorite rock/pop songs, and writing the worst originals I’ll ever write. But looking back, I think the variety of the music I produced helped expand my production sensibilities and the ability to finish full songs, rather than just fragments.

Getting back to your question though – I think what made me comfortable enough to fully distribute my first album was the fact that the songs came from a very honest place. I also thought that they were at least semi-professional sounding. I spent so much time making that first album, and the whole time with the intent of releasing it. While the production (particularly the mixing) is subpar to my production standards today, I’m still proud of the compositions on the album, and I’m so glad I got “past the hypothetical” and released it!

TMN: How do your previous EPs different from this one?

Great question! Now that some time has passed between my Fiction and Purpose EPs, it’s easy for me to distinguish them. In my opinion, Fiction is the most “poppy” of the three. It’s a concept album about a failed relationship, and love is a typical subject for pop.. On top of that, it’s mostly lighter in energy and sound design, and doesn’t really have any jarring moments throughout the whole EP. In comparison, Purpose has the heavier, more complex sound design. Coupled with the introspective lyrics, I think Purpose is more of an electronic dance music fan’s EP. I’d consider Falsework to be more similar to Purpose than it is to Fiction, but it’s much more eclectic than Purpose. I consciously tried to incorporate as many different styles as I could naturally write, so I ended up with a record that has a lot of influences.

TMN: Any cool Adam Tell things going on besides music releases?

Not a whole lot! Mostly just settling into my career as a CPA and trying to not spend all of my income on plugins and equipment! I did just finish my first live show at 515 Alive, and I’m planning on performing more after I get some time to focus on producing again.

TMN: If you could throw a tour together, who would be the dream team featured on it?

This is an easy one. If we’re going full dream team, I’d no doubt choose to support Imogen Heap on tour. That would be the absolute top. But here on planet Earth, I’d be really honored to tour with Fox Stevenson, Chime, and a lot of other musicians that I’ve been meeting lately!

TMN: Are you slowing down or speeding up in terms of content as we head toward 2018?

I’ve just released ten songs in the last two months, so I’m hoping that that keeps my fans happy for a little while! But I’ve got a couple more collaborations in the making that I’m expecting to have out by the end of the year. As for 2018, I’m going to be trying new styles, and the plan is to speed up, for sure. I recently switched to Ableton from Logic, and it’s already changing the way I produce and improving my efficiency. Oh, and I’d love to start writing for media in 2018 if I can get the opportunities.

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Galimatias – Blowback [TMN Interview/Single Release]

Galimatias
Blowback

LA-based Danish artist Galimatias has been featured many times here on The Music Ninja. Known for his decadent piano chords and swirling melodies, Galimatias makes some of the most soulful tunes out there today. Transcending genres, he effortlessly blends together aspects of soul, jazz, hip-hop, and R&B. Galimatias has always hit us with sultry, emotional tunes that can instantly set the mood.

To help kick off your week, I’m excited to share Galimatias’ new sinful single, “Blowback”. Paying homage to one of his main musical muses, Matias samples Barbara Lewis’ 1963 soul classic “Hello Stranger”. Subdued electronic elements overlaid on pulsating rhythms and tight R&B beats create some characteristically sensual vibes on this track. Galimatias throws in his own ad-libs and vocal riffs; part of his effort to incorporate voice as part of his musical arsenal. Lewis’ sensual crooning is not overpowered whatsoever– showing Matias’ mastery of blending together such different musical elements.

As a TMN favorite, Galimatias has been interviewed by us before. I was lucky enough to catch up with him again, as he enters the newest phase of his solo career. Listen to the track above and read up on the interview after the jump: Continue reading

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Lil Debbie Talks New Album, The State Of Hip-hop & Rising Talent [TMN Interview]

Respect is earned, it’s not simply given out to anybody. Unfortunately for women, that respect is even tougher to come by in the creative world especially, but one OG boss who has been doing her own thing for years – gaining mad respect and praise from all crowds – is Lil Debbie. The rapper, model, weed connoisseur and fashion designer isn’t someone who will be going away anytime soon.

Lil Debbie has set up a foundation that is going to last. She’s come from music and that has laid the groundwork for a successful multi-faceted career. Moves will always be made, but her latest move hearkens back to the music by means of a brand new album, OG In My System. Complete with eleven tracks, including her lead single “Summer,” this LP sees Debbie taking her sound to new territories.

Stagnant isn’t a word in Lil Debbie’s vocabulary. Over the years she’s released an incredible amount of songs, each time out taking steps to offer fans something a little different. The Bay Area beast is a legend in her own right, but the tale isn’t over. We’re sure to have more music, as you’ll find out below. Lil Debbie recently stopped by the dojo for an interview, answering questions about her new album, where hip-hop is currently and what artists she has her eyes on.

TMN: Let’s start with a totally unfair question, which song is your favorite on the OG In My System?

LD: “I Get It” has to be one of my top 3.

TMN: Can you give us a rundown of what it was like putting together this LP?

LD: It was interesting, I’m always evolving, developing and progressing so it’s interesting to watch my inner self grow – going through sadness and bossyness.

TMN: What makes this album different from your previous work?

LD: Well for one I’m experimenting with Auto-tune, also I’m playing around with melodies and flow switch up. Definitely trying out new things and playing around while I still can.

TMN: Why did you choose to release the single “Summer” first? How much fun was it shooting the music video?

“Summer” represents such a lighter time of my life, I felt like it was necessary to drop that first. The video was a lot of fun, I honestly had no clue I was even going to shoot a video. Me and my girls just decided one day to play around with equipment we brought out to the islands. Most of it is just random footage of us wandering around by ourselves getting stoned and lost.

TMN: Being a stoner myself, I have to wonder… approximately how much weed went into the making of this album?

LD: POUNDS.

TMN: You’ve released an LP or mixtape every year over the past few years, looking to keep that going in the future?

LD: Yea, you know me, I’m not a quitter.

TMN: You recently did a project with the Barong Family. Looking to work with dance music producers more often?

LD: Yes, I love dance music and I love creating with all types of producers. I was sooo blessed to be able to be apart of a Barong Family project!

TMN: As someone who doesn’t stick to just music, what other ventures do you currently have going on right now?

As of right now I am working on my marijuana brand cakes, which is an edible line but I also do carry live resin and a cakes marijuana strain. I’m also working on other things for my fans but as of right now this is one of my main focuses.

TMN: Is there something you have yet to get your hands in that you would like to?

LD: Yea some Rose Dom Perignon! LOL.

TMN: Style is something you own and there’s no better, more permanent way to express style than with tattoos. What has been your latest addition and what’s next?

LD: I recently got legs in the air with panties sliding down the legs and two nails that are just filling in some space on my arm in between two other tattoos. I never know what I’m going to get tatted I just get things last minute.

TMN: Where do you think the rap game is at currently and where do you see it going?

LD: The rap game is in a dope dope dope dooopppeeee space as of right now. There’s a lot of freedom for artists to express themselves and a lot of outlets. All blessings!

TMN: Can you tell us some up and coming talent in the Bay Area that everyone should know?

Everyone should check out my girl that is super clean, her name is Aliky, check out her Instagram which has all her music info @Aliikyw. Also another girl that is dope that can also sing is Natty Kay, her Instagram info is @NattyKay7.

OG In My System was released today and is currently available on iTunes and Spotify.

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NVDES – La Nvdité Vol. 1 [TMN Exclusive Interview & EP Review]

NVDES
Do You Think About Me

LA-based music collective NVDES has made a few appearances here on TMN. Led by frontman Josh Ocean, this free-flowing art project is teeming with joyous energy and has gifted us with many feel-good jams, like this one. NVDES’ music is delightfully fun, meshing pop sensibilities with modern punk vibes.

NVDES received global acclaim for his last EP, Life with Lobsters in 2016, earning a feature on Zane Lowes’ Beats 1, and reaching the Spotify Global Viral Chart. So, naturally, we were excited to hear NVDES’ latest EP, La Nvdité Vol. 1, which is out now on Kobalt.

The opener of the 5 track EP, “May and June”, perfectly encapsulates the infectious energy that NVDES songs display so frequently. Dancy beats in combination with the electro-punk sound of that guitar will make you forget that summer’s coming to an end soon. In juxtaposition with this track, “Do You Think About Me” does an excellent job of showing the emotional range that NVDES possesses. This wistful track inspired by a long-distance romance maintains that summery feel while pondering over a melancholy topic like a strained love. Check out the music video for third track “Dancer From New York” below:

I was lucky enough to chat briefly with NVDES’ Josh Ocean about the collective, and this latest project. Read up below! 
Continue reading

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