[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (December 2016 Round #2)

indie-dojo-music-ninjaIf you are a lover of all music like ourselves, you can most likely agree that it’s totally possible to go through genre phases. We pretty much love all types of music (with a few exceptions), but we sometimes get stuck listening to one specific kind for a longer period of time than another. This is not a bad thing at all, but this can cause us forget to step out and continue to explore this vast musical world in front of us. And that’s where the Indie Dojo comes into play. A eclectic concoction of indie tunes that will pull you out of the hole or maybe drill you deeper into the one you are already in. Who knows. Either way, its music. And who cares what we choose to swirl around in. As long as we love it and damnit we do.

’Ama Lou – Not Always’
’Honor – Over’
’The Natterjacks – What We’re Told’
’Errmine – Driver’s Seat’
’Sunny Pache – A Song Called Garrett County’
’Racoon Racoon – Our Love’s Funeral’
’O Little Sister – Cold Feet’
’EthansRoom – I’m A Believer (Smash Mouth cover)’
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Catching up with The Vryll Society [EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]

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Back in October of last year, we had the massive pleasure of bringing you guys the first full listen to the debut EP from Liverpool-based act The Vryll Society. We’re sure you were instantly hooked, just as we were, by the wide-ranging offerings infused with psychedelic, funk, folk, and classic rock influences. Well, if they happened to fall off your radar since then, we’re here to rope you in once again. With their most recent release coming out just a few weeks ago, we thought it was a good time to get reacquainted.

TMN: Hey fellas! It’s great to sit down and catch up with you. After all, it’s been just over a year since we covered your debut EP. So – tell us. What has life been like since you released Pangea.

TVS: We’ve just been building on it as much as possible to be honest, it’s been the catalyst to spark it all off. It gave people an idea of what an album by ourselves would entail.

TMN: Being on this side of the equation, we don’t think bands know just how excited we get to help break them. Conversely, we probably don’t know what you’re going through. Talk to us about getting early support from blogs, tastemakers, and radio stations.

TVS: Well I think if you’re not getting support from those types of avenues you need to have a good look at yourself! As much as you can pretend you don’t care what people think, if you’re putting music out and no one has got a good word to say about it that’s going to affect you, so having people acknowledging your work as being of a high quality is what’s needed as you embark on your journey.

TMN: Have you had a few “holy shit” moments over the past year? You know – where something so amazing happens you can only manage to utter one thing. Holy shit. Name one:
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[MP3 Playlist] Indie Dojo (December 2016 Round #1)

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We’re making a list, checking it twice. We don’t care who’s naughty or nice ’cause we’re gonna sharing this list of damn good indie music with you either way.

’Dorsalfins – High Low’
’Computer Magic – Dimensions’
’bloodmoon – homeland’
’jarles kavhellen – The Ghost in Your Smile’
’Over the Trees – Hello Oslo’
’Om Shanka – Holy Man’
’Slumbers – Doboom Soom’
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[Video] Joe Goddard – Lose Your Love

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Easily one of the most influential architects thriving around the edges of dance & electronic music today, Joe Goddard seems to carry a certain gravitas whenever his name is attached to anything. Known by most casuals as one of the chief patrons behind almighty indie-tronica troupe Hot Chip, and co-founder of Greco-Roman Records (the same label which helmed debut releases from the likes of Disclosure, Roosevelt & TEED), Goddard has also quietly carved out quite the tastemaking assemblage of admirers over the course of 20 years worth of high profile remix work as a solo artist. Goddard’s latest single to come from the aforementioned Greco-Roman camp, “Lose Your Love”, received its visual counterpart today, and quite honestly, it’s one of the more polished and funnier music videos we’ve seen over the year.

On its own, “Lose Yourself” is a soulfully lovely, throwback house ditty propped up by robotic synths, but through the execution of director Fred Rowson, it takes on even more personality. In line with Goddard & Hot Chip’s playful nature, Rowson crafts a quite honestly hilarious homage to modern-day, cultish ‘healing’. Pacing things off in what looks to be a rec-center based yoga class before delving into offbeat 80’s VHS tapes, a street recruitment of followers, and climaxing with a Shakers type religious group convulsion on the floor, Goddard’s created a cheeky accompaniment to a catchy tune, and done it well. Really, I don’t even know what I just watched but I laughed and loved pretty much every second of it. Have a play for yourself below.

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[Alternative/Rock] Nisus Cede & XHVIL

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ONMZUSS027: Nisus Cede & XHVIL
Fake A Smile

“Fake A Smile” by Nisus Cede and XHVIL is the 27th installment in the expansive Single Series from New York City’s eclectic Onamazu label. The Onamazu Single Series established a pattern for dark wave anthems and raw electronic experimentalism of the highest quality, but “Fake A Smile” is a more acoustic, sensitive offering that smacks more of Coldplay than Nine Inch Nails.

Netherlands native and Onamazu affiliate Nisus Cede, whose name is Latin for “attempted murder”, combines a most musical mind with a set of production chops that betray his very modest SoundCloud profile. The drum machine percussion he’s put together on “Fake A Smile” could easily be mistaken for the real thing – full of variation, fills, and crisp cymbals. The acoustic timbre of the drums pairs perfectly with the guitar and vocals tracked by Cede’s associate XVHIL, all of which is arranged along with a twangy stand-up bassline. “Fake A Smile” feels like new ground for the growing New York City collective Onamazu, which seems to be diversifying it’s offering with every new release. Hopefully the label’s future includes more of these unique, melancholic pop stylings from the Netherlands.

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[Indie] Charge The Atlantic – Something You Feel

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Charge The Atlantic
Something You Feel

Something we are really feeling is “Something You Feel,” the new single from Nashville’s Charge The Atlantic. It’s a whole bunch of things that we have come to love, mashed up in one composition, executed to perfection by some magnificently talented musicians.

“Something You Feel” has a bit of everything, taking cues from styles like indie, jazz, alternative, pop and more. It’s not easy to take from so many places and make one cohesive song, but Charge The Atlantic did just that without skipping a beat. Every single second of this song is enjoyable, but more than that, it is a ride you are going to want to take over and over again. It’s peaks and valleys are equally engaging, despite their difference in energy. This push and pull is just one of the many reasons why “Something You Feel” is one of our favorite tunes this month. Get your copy today on iTunes.

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[TMN Exclusive Interview] Goldroom Delves Into West of the West & Musical Metamorphosis

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Unless this is the first time you’ve trekked through the hallowed grounds of TMN, you’ve no doubt ran into at least a song or two from L.A. based producer Josh Legg and his solo remix project turned nationally touring live act Goldroom. He, and the rest of Goldroom’s live iteration just recently wrapped an expansive, 30 date live co-headlining tour with fellow TMN regulars Autograf, and before quite a memorable show in Boulder, CO, we had a chance to catch up with Josh on the heels of Goldroom’s debut long-player West of the West, and ended up having one of the more in-depth conversations regarding music we’ve had in some time. Enjoy our interview with Goldroom below.

The Music Ninja (TMN): Alright… Matthew Bloss of The Music Ninja here with Josh Legg, the mastermind behind the Goldroom acclaim. First off, thanks so much for taking the time before your show to sit down with us. Firstly, you just recently released your first full length LP under the Goldroom name, West of the West, which we’ve had the chance to listen to a couple times and I really, really enjoyed it. After talking to friends around the music industry who know you, and from following your social media accounts, this was something that has been years in the making. Can you speak a little more to that? How long has West of the West, been coming together, and how does it feel now that it’s finally out?

Josh Legg (JL): Yeah, I mean there was a moment in time, probably in 2013, right after we started to tour with the live band for the first time, that it was just really clear that at some point if things went the right way that at some point I was going to need to put a record out. And I’ve always lived my life, sort of through albums of other people’s. So, I started thinking about it right then… I was thinking about the first Goldroom record as early as January of 2013, so I’ve kind of been writing for it for three years now. But, I don’t know, it’s weird… You were saying earlier, that you guys have been paying attention for along time. But, if I walk into a radio station or something like that, I’m going to talk about it (West of the West) like it’s my first statement, but in a lot of ways it feels like my sophomore record because the Embrace EP took me all around the world twice, and I got to play Coachella this year, and I released that independently… and that EP did all of this. It’s a seven song EP, and for a lot of purposes it worked as my debut full-length record, so this is actually closer to my sophomore record from sort of a traditional perspective. But, I wasn’t thinking about that EP in the same way that I was thinking about West of the West. I wasn’t thinking like, “Hey, would I be proud of this if I died?” But, I have been thinking about that with this record. I wanted this record to be so good that, when I die, I’m going to be like “I have this at least. At least I did this, and I’m proud of it.” hahaha. And, I don’t know, as things went a long, I started to feel more and more strongly about certain things about the way producers in my world were making records. And I was getting more and more discouraged with the fact that it was just this endless cycle of people throwing acapellas to each other, and getting random features and finsing out that the artists, that you think that you love didn’t even write the song that you loved. And, I want a glimpse into people’s hearts I guess. And so, the only thing that I promised with this record is that for better or for worse, it would really be me.

’Goldroom – Silhouette’

Read the rest of our interview with Josh Legg after the jump!

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