[DnB] Pola – Sound Killa / Little Do I Know feat. Bryzone

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The fourth digital release from East London’s Soulvent Records comes from Pola, one third of the label’s personnel. His debut release ‘Sound Killa’ blends new and old influences well – mixing warm liquid tones with an old school rolling beat. Out on July 6th, it features a well-known jungle sample alongside surging drum progessions and rave-style piano chords.

On the flip meanwhile comes ‘Little Do I Know’. Features vocals provided by Pola himself,  it also features label mate Bryzone. A stirring and atmospheric track, Pola blends melancholic chords with a gritty live drum sound.

These are two sophisticated pieces of work from producer and DJ Pola, who has gained a nod of approval from the likes of Hospital Records artists Etherwood and Logistics. We look forward to hearing more from this young talent.

Pola
Sound Killa
Pola
Little Do I Know feat. Bryzone
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[Alternative/Rock] Spoon – Do You

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After a four-year hiatus, Austin-based indie rock mainstays Spoon are back and as spry as ever with the first official single off their forthcoming eighth record, They Want My Soul.

“Do You” is classic Spoon, with Britt Daniel’s pleading vocals calling out over intertwining guitar and piano along with the type of softened, echoing “do-do-dos” only the best instant sing-alongs are made of. Despite the ferocious intensity of the three-eyed lion in the artwork, the track is actually quite warm and inviting, and you can almost feel the audiences clapping in time already.

Written immediately after Daniel’s side-project Divine Fits concluded touring last year, They Want My Soul is scheduled to become the Texas outfit’s first LP on new label Loma Vista upon its release on August 5th, though there’s still plenty of summer left to bounce along to this song in the meantime.

“Do You” is available for purchase on iTunes, or better, through the band’s new Vinyl Gratification program.

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[Indie] Phoria – Atomic

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Phoria -
Atomic

Last month TMN gave Phoria the accolade of Bombay Bicycle-esque indie intellects; this month sees us fairly vindicated.

New release “Atomic”, taken from their current EP Display, proves another part of what is shaping up to be a seamlessly sewn jigsaw puzzle. Piece by piece Phoria are creating the bigger picture: an exercise in ethereal fluidity and electronic euphoria. Whilst each track possesses stand-alone strength to admire, the craft of their contemplative EP, is almost conceptual in it’s coalescent execution. More a precision project, than a pile of pieces.

“Atomic” exudes and resonates star gazing and introspective qualities; echoic vocals delicately reverberating with controlled sadness and a firm grasp on smart, minimalistic melancholia.

The Brighton based band have initiated a buzz beyond their base camp. Stirring up the home and international music shores with some nu-wave modernized British indie.

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[Event Preview] Bixel Boys EP Launch Party at Exchange LA 7/5

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After an impressive set at this years Electric Daisy Carnival, Bixel Boys have definitely become the next rising duo to take charge in the dance music world. With support pouring in from all directions, Bixel Boys are finally receiving the recognition and praise they deserve by snagging their first ever headlining slot at the infamous Los Angeles nightclub, Exchange LA, for Insomniac Presents: Inception Saturdays (7/5).

With the launch of their upcoming EP, Empire, the boys felt it would be suitable to throw an epic release party at one of LA’s hottest nightclubs in town. The Bixel Boys alone should already have you standing outside on the streets of Downtown LA, but it doesn’t end there.  This weekends line-up is packed with some massive support coming from Brazzabelle, Hotel Garuda, and Tropicool. We can expect just as much heat from the openers as we can from the main headliner, so if you’re in town and don’t want to suffer from the dreadful FOMO syndrome (fear of missing out), then we highly suggest heading down to Exchange this Saturday night to come boogie with Bixel Boys and friends.

If you’ve never experienced a night out at Exchange, then you definitely need to come party with some ninjas and get your groove on in one of LA’s most historical venues. Killer drinks, killer music, and a badass history lesson to top off the night? Sounds like a good time if you ask us! Well, what are you waiting for? Don’t be one to miss out on all the fun and grab some tickets today – we promise this is one party you do not want to miss.

Purchase tickets here: Bixel Boys @ Exchange LA 7/5

Bixel Boys
Clutch (Original Mix)
Thomas Newson ft. Angelika Vee
Dont Hold Us (Bixel Boys Remix)

Supporting artists:

Brazzabelle & Shintaro Yasuda
Borena
Sharam Ft. Honey Honey
My Way (Hotel Garuda Radio Mix)
Miami Horror
Real Slow (Tropicool Remix)

 

 

 

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[Deep House] Adele- Rolling In The Deep (Bender Remix)

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Adele- Rolling In The Deep (Bender Remix)

Do you all remember a time where Adele was the hottest thing to have happened to the world? We definitely remember those lonely Friday nights spent with Ben & Jerry’s ice cream while crying over our ex-boyfriends/girlfriends and then Adele would just show up out of the blue univited. To her defense, she couldn’t stay away or fight it so we’ll give her the benefit of the doubt.

Now that some time has passed between her latest sob story, we have deemed it socially acceptable for her classic tear-jerkers to surface upon the internet once again. What better way to start us off with some throwback feels than with “Rolling In The Deep”? New Jersey based producer (and recent TMN favorite), Bender, felt it was time to stir things up a bit with his newest remix of “Rolling In The Deep” in which he throws us all back into a nostalgic time machine and forces us to re-live our old, crappy relationships. This scenario seems terrible, however, Bender gives us every reason to put a smile on our face and dance our way back into the past. Who doesn’t love a sense of empowerment when facing those rough times?

After falling in love with his last remix of Route 94′s “My Love”, we knew that he would blow us all away with his deep house spin on an Adele song – and he did. The grimey basslines and dubbed down vocals collectively give this song the right amount of darkness, aggression, and sass to get us up and moving out on the dance floor. Make sure to grab your free download and allow yourself to go one deeper with this one – we promise you won’t miss your ex.

 

 

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[Deep House] KRONO feat. VanJess – Redlight (Pretty Pink Remix)

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KRONO feat. VanJess
Redlight (Pretty Pink Remix)

After her stunning remix of U2′s, “Ordinary Love”, Pretty Pink proved to us all that there are artists in this world who still know how to make awe-inspiring dance music without losing their integrity along the way. We here at TMN fell in love with Pretty Pink a few weeks ago and realized that we like how her music makes us feel and we really don’t see this relationship we have with her ending anytime soon.

Earlier this week, Pretty Pink unleashed one of her most impressive remixes to date. The German goddess took on KRONO’s melodic masterpiece, “Redlight”, which features the soulful and blissful vocals of VanJess. If you’ve heard the original “Redlight”, then you remember the chillness factor that we experienced at the time of its release. Pretty Pink decided to add her deep house touch and brought some heat back into this chilly track. Without straying too far away from the soulfulness of the original, Pretty Pink turned this ambient song into a funky deep house anthem with a bitchin’ bassline that’ll have grandma in a roaring frenzy to break in her new orthopedic dancing shoes.

With that said, we highly recommend that you keep your local fire department on speed dial because this one emits a burst of heat strong enough to set every fire alarm off in town. Well, maybe not that serious, but grandma might get lost in these groovy vibes and have herself a tumble.

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The Evolution of Asher Roth [TMN Exclusive Interview]

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Asher Paul Roth
Tangerine Girl (prod. Blended Babies)

For about as long as the arts have existed, creative individuals have been forced to toe the line between commercial success and unrestricted artistic freedom. In contemporary music, going too far in one direction leads to the label of “sell out,” while the other end of the spectrum is categorized as “too experimental”–it is a nearly impossible balance to achieve.

In 2009, a 24-year old Asher Roth released a song titled “I Love College” that catapulted him into the mainstream placing him squarely at this intersection. With a record deal in place, everything was set for Roth to reach material success as long as he was willing to concede that releases like his first big hit were definitive of him as a musician. Five years later, Asher independently released his first studio album since 2009, RetroHash, and it is truly a reflection of the creative, liberating journey he has taken since his initial success. The genre-encompassing project, filled with positive summer vibes, captures the incredible energy of a spirit freed. We were lucky enough to chat with Asher Roth, someone who has decided to pave his own path, about his truly fascinating evolution, both as a person and an artist. Grab a copy of RetroHash on iTunes and check out Asher’s upcoming tour dates on his website.

TMN: First of all, thanks so much for taking the time to chat today. I’m really looking forward to this conversation because, to be honest, I listened to RetroHash when it first dropped and it kind of blew me away in terms what you did with it and how you’ve grown as an artist.

Asher Roth: Very cool, man. Thank you.

TMN: So, let’s rewind a few years back because you’ve had such a unique career trajectory—I hear you describe it as a ’Benjamin Button experience.’ Take us back to when you first linked up with Scooter [Braun] and just how fast everything happened leading up to the release of Asleep in the Bread Aisle?

Asher: I just remember when Scooter called [Tom] Boyd, who’s a close friend, and we had a Facebook fan page with like 40 people on there and Boyd had his number on there. [Scooter] called him saying, “This is the most important phone call your boy’s every going to get.” You know Boyd runs over and we started talking. Anybody that knows Scooter knows he’s a talker—he’s a charming young man. So, next thing you know, we had moved ourselves down to Atlanta. And that’s literally what it felt like, you know. After that conversation, Boyder, myself and Brain [Bangley] moved ourselves down to Atlanta to be in it and amongst it. Because as fun and loving as Westchester is, and Pennsylvania in general, to really kind of do it you have to immerse yourself in it. So we moved ourselves down to Atlanta, put together The GreenHouse Effect mixtape, and kind of on the tail of that mixtape, ‘I Love College’ was written and put out on MySpace.

No album was in the works—it wasn’t like we had a whole album together and ‘I Love College’ was going to be the first single. With that record we were like, “yeah, it’s cute. This is fun and all, but this song sucks. you know what I mean?” [Laughs] It just blew up and that’s when I ended up linking with my buddy Orin (of Blended Babies]. And just trying to make sense of ‘I Love College’ and build an album around it which ultimately became Asleep in the Bread Aisle. And, you know, as that happened, I dealt with some politics through the Universal system with that album. I felt like I made a “responsible record.” We did the best we could do with the hand we were dealt. Just a lot of the promises and expectations, from a structure standpoint, didn’t get met. And that was my first red flag of, “this is an interesting business.”

So, my next step after that was Seared Foie Gras with Quince & Cranberry because I was starting to see the perspective that people didn’t really know me.

I was polarized because of one record and people were like, “that’s who Asher is.” And I hadn’t actually had a proper introduction. First impressions are everything, and for me, it has been quite the journey of properly introducing myself rather than, you know, one side of me. I don’t know many people that don’t like to have a drink, and dance, and be around females, and have a good time. But to say that’s all somebody is—for someone who wants to be here, and isn’t necessarily trying to cash out on the music business, but more so be appreciative of the opportunity to make music—it stung a little bit. So, ever since then, I’ve wanted to step back from the business side of things and make music that felt right.

TMN: Back to the present, RetroHash is your first studio album since Asleep in the Bread Aisle, and the career moves in that time have been insane. You signed with David Sitek’s Federal Prism

Asher: You know, that actually didn’t it happen—it got falsely reported. Dave Sitek is the homie, I love that dude. We did ‘Apples and Bananas’ together, and we released that as a single. For some reason, it got reported that we were putting out a whole album together. Dave Sitek is a close homie, we definitely make music together, but RetroHash was self-released.

TMN: Ah, I did not know that. I’m glad you clarified, because the internet is completely misinformed on that one (Roth was listed on Federal Prism’s roster on their website). Everywhere I looked, it said that was the label.

Asher: Yeah, it’s a trip that you can go on someone’s Wikipedia and it can be actually wrong! [Laughs]

TMN: As far as releasing an album independently, what was it like in terms of the creative control you got as compared with when you working on Asleep in the Bread Aisle? Like you said, it was kind of a safer record. How did that impact the sound of your music and the comfortability in the studio?

 Asher: Ah dude, it was awesome. And its not like we ever felt like we were making an album, you know what I mean? It’s not like we were like, “what’s the single going to be,” or “let’s write a song for the girls.” That never happened. We were just making music, we had pillars and were like, “this is cool, that’s cool. Let’s keep going.” Next thing we knew, we had a batch of songs and we just wanted to put them out. People have kind of been like, “where’ve you been for the last five years?” And, truth be told, I’ve been untangling myself from this web. Instead of digging ourselves in deeper and trying to fulfill contracts, I’ve kind of been patient, asked nicely, been very respectful. I didn’t shit on anybody on the way up and I didn’t shit on anybody on the way down. When it got down to the point when it was like, “Asher do you know what you want to do,” I said, “Yes, I’d just like to leave my contract and wipe the slate clean.” And I feel like musically as well, RetroHash has let me do that.
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