[Deep House] KRONO feat. VanJess – Redlight (Pretty Pink Remix)

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KRONO feat. VanJess
Redlight (Pretty Pink Remix)

After her stunning remix of U2’s, “Ordinary Love”, Pretty Pink proved to us all that there are artists in this world who still know how to make awe-inspiring dance music without losing their integrity along the way. We here at TMN fell in love with Pretty Pink a few weeks ago and realized that we like how her music makes us feel and we really don’t see this relationship we have with her ending anytime soon.

Earlier this week, Pretty Pink unleashed one of her most impressive remixes to date. The German goddess took on KRONO’s melodic masterpiece, “Redlight”, which features the soulful and blissful vocals of VanJess. If you’ve heard the original “Redlight”, then you remember the chillness factor that we experienced at the time of its release. Pretty Pink decided to add her deep house touch and brought some heat back into this chilly track. Without straying too far away from the soulfulness of the original, Pretty Pink turned this ambient song into a funky deep house anthem with a bitchin’ bassline that’ll have grandma in a roaring frenzy to break in her new orthopedic dancing shoes.

With that said, we highly recommend that you keep your local fire department on speed dial because this one emits a burst of heat strong enough to set every fire alarm off in town. Well, maybe not that serious, but grandma might get lost in these groovy vibes and have herself a tumble.

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The Evolution of Asher Roth [TMN Exclusive Interview]

RetroHash
Asher Paul Roth
Tangerine Girl (prod. Blended Babies)

For about as long as the arts have existed, creative individuals have been forced to toe the line between commercial success and unrestricted artistic freedom. In contemporary music, going too far in one direction leads to the label of “sell out,” while the other end of the spectrum is categorized as “too experimental”–it is a nearly impossible balance to achieve.

In 2009, a 24-year old Asher Roth released a song titled “I Love College” that catapulted him into the mainstream placing him squarely at this intersection. With a record deal in place, everything was set for Roth to reach material success as long as he was willing to concede that releases like his first big hit were definitive of him as a musician. Five years later, Asher independently released his first studio album since 2009, RetroHash, and it is truly a reflection of the creative, liberating journey he has taken since his initial success. The genre-encompassing project, filled with positive summer vibes, captures the incredible energy of a spirit freed. We were lucky enough to chat with Asher Roth, someone who has decided to pave his own path, about his truly fascinating evolution, both as a person and an artist. Grab a copy of RetroHash on iTunes and check out Asher’s upcoming tour dates on his website.

TMN: First of all, thanks so much for taking the time to chat today. I’m really looking forward to this conversation because, to be honest, I listened to RetroHash when it first dropped and it kind of blew me away in terms what you did with it and how you’ve grown as an artist.

Asher Roth: Very cool, man. Thank you.

TMN: So, let’s rewind a few years back because you’ve had such a unique career trajectory—I hear you describe it as a ’Benjamin Button experience.’ Take us back to when you first linked up with Scooter [Braun] and just how fast everything happened leading up to the release of Asleep in the Bread Aisle?

Asher: I just remember when Scooter called [Tom] Boyd, who’s a close friend, and we had a Facebook fan page with like 40 people on there and Boyd had his number on there. [Scooter] called him saying, “This is the most important phone call your boy’s every going to get.” You know Boyd runs over and we started talking. Anybody that knows Scooter knows he’s a talker—he’s a charming young man. So, next thing you know, we had moved ourselves down to Atlanta. And that’s literally what it felt like, you know. After that conversation, Boyder, myself and Brain [Bangley] moved ourselves down to Atlanta to be in it and amongst it. Because as fun and loving as Westchester is, and Pennsylvania in general, to really kind of do it you have to immerse yourself in it. So we moved ourselves down to Atlanta, put together The GreenHouse Effect mixtape, and kind of on the tail of that mixtape, ‘I Love College’ was written and put out on MySpace.

No album was in the works—it wasn’t like we had a whole album together and ‘I Love College’ was going to be the first single. With that record we were like, “yeah, it’s cute. This is fun and all, but this song sucks. you know what I mean?” [Laughs] It just blew up and that’s when I ended up linking with my buddy Orin (of Blended Babies]. And just trying to make sense of ‘I Love College’ and build an album around it which ultimately became Asleep in the Bread Aisle. And, you know, as that happened, I dealt with some politics through the Universal system with that album. I felt like I made a “responsible record.” We did the best we could do with the hand we were dealt. Just a lot of the promises and expectations, from a structure standpoint, didn’t get met. And that was my first red flag of, “this is an interesting business.”

So, my next step after that was Seared Foie Gras with Quince & Cranberry because I was starting to see the perspective that people didn’t really know me.

I was polarized because of one record and people were like, “that’s who Asher is.” And I hadn’t actually had a proper introduction. First impressions are everything, and for me, it has been quite the journey of properly introducing myself rather than, you know, one side of me. I don’t know many people that don’t like to have a drink, and dance, and be around females, and have a good time. But to say that’s all somebody is—for someone who wants to be here, and isn’t necessarily trying to cash out on the music business, but more so be appreciative of the opportunity to make music—it stung a little bit. So, ever since then, I’ve wanted to step back from the business side of things and make music that felt right.

TMN: Back to the present, RetroHash is your first studio album since Asleep in the Bread Aisle, and the career moves in that time have been insane. You signed with David Sitek’s Federal Prism

Asher: You know, that actually didn’t it happen—it got falsely reported. Dave Sitek is the homie, I love that dude. We did ‘Apples and Bananas’ together, and we released that as a single. For some reason, it got reported that we were putting out a whole album together. Dave Sitek is a close homie, we definitely make music together, but RetroHash was self-released.

TMN: Ah, I did not know that. I’m glad you clarified, because the internet is completely misinformed on that one (Roth was listed on Federal Prism’s roster on their website). Everywhere I looked, it said that was the label.

Asher: Yeah, it’s a trip that you can go on someone’s Wikipedia and it can be actually wrong! [Laughs]

TMN: As far as releasing an album independently, what was it like in terms of the creative control you got as compared with when you working on Asleep in the Bread Aisle? Like you said, it was kind of a safer record. How did that impact the sound of your music and the comfortability in the studio?

 Asher: Ah dude, it was awesome. And its not like we ever felt like we were making an album, you know what I mean? It’s not like we were like, “what’s the single going to be,” or “let’s write a song for the girls.” That never happened. We were just making music, we had pillars and were like, “this is cool, that’s cool. Let’s keep going.” Next thing we knew, we had a batch of songs and we just wanted to put them out. People have kind of been like, “where’ve you been for the last five years?” And, truth be told, I’ve been untangling myself from this web. Instead of digging ourselves in deeper and trying to fulfill contracts, I’ve kind of been patient, asked nicely, been very respectful. I didn’t shit on anybody on the way up and I didn’t shit on anybody on the way down. When it got down to the point when it was like, “Asher do you know what you want to do,” I said, “Yes, I’d just like to leave my contract and wipe the slate clean.” And I feel like musically as well, RetroHash has let me do that.
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[Deep House] Rootkit – Real Love (ft. Danyka Nadeau)

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Rootkit
Real Love (feat. Danyka Nadeau)

We’ve said it before and we will say it again, Monstercat has NO limits when it comes to the talent they bring to the table. We have become such big fans of that label and can only expect more greatness from them in the future – and by future, we mean today.

After receiving an abundance of support from music lovers from all over, drum and bass kitten, Rootkit shocked the internet yesterday with his newest original, “Real Love” featuring the phenomenal vocals of Danyka Nadeau. Notorious for his drum and bass roots, Rootkit did a complete 180 degree turn into an entirely different realm of dance music with this deep house track. The young producer proves that there are no barriers in music so long as you execute your work in a stylistic and badass manner – and that is exactly what he did with this tune. The powerful vocals from Danyka effortlessly blend with the deep, unforseen melodic undertones that collectively create the perfect vibe suitable for every warm and intimate setting.

If this doesn’t make you want to be in some dark, hot, and sweaty underground club, then you might want to keep this on repeat until you get to that point. Cheers, ninjas!

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Caleb L’Etoile – Body Water EP [TMN Premiere]

Caleb L'Etoile - Body Water EP
’Reservoirs’
’S.A.Y.’

You may remember Caleb L’Etoile from a week back when we premiered his song with Will Eastman. Well Caleb is back with a two track EP that will get you prepped for summer! Lead taste maker and resident DJ at Blisspop, Caleb L’Etoile, never ceases to amaze me with his music. The vibes on these two records are a bit 90s meet new age house music. While some artists are busy running the trap, Caleb L’Etoile is taking you on a journey to dance like you were back in the 90s. If any of you readers are out of the DC area, or may be popping in around the 12th, Caleb L’Etoile will be performing with Smallpools at Lil’ Miss Whiskey’s in the Atlas District. There will be a follow up to this EP titled the Water Body EP, which you can expect to here from us! Rumor has it that it includes a collaboration with Ryan McLaughlin of Typefighter. Until then, take a swim in this lovely Body Water EP!

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[Indie] The Griswolds – Down and Out

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The Griswolds
Down and Out

If you’re not turned onto The Griswolds yet, this song will surely make you scramble to like them on Facebook, follow them on soundcloud, track them on Spotify, and search Google Images for The Griswold’s wallpaper. Ok, that last one might have gone too far, but the trajectory of this young Aussie band is nothing short of spectacular. Since their release of “Beware the Dog,” it seems like the world is twitterpated with their sound, and honestly – we can’t blame them.

This Sydney-based five piece has taken a slight departure from their folksy, raw, and somewhat humorous ways to lay down this monster indie-pop, synth-driven tune. “Down and Out,” boasts a massively dancy appeal, carrying the need to boogie through an engaging synth melody and some rippin’ guitar chords. Coupled with some lyrics that we could easily see a festival crowd belting out at the top of their lungs, this song carries supercharged feelings we’ve felt from other former-indie-now-gigantic acts like The Naked and Famous, The 1975, and Foster the People.

This song can be found on their debut album B E I M P R E S S I V E available August 26th via Wind Up Records.

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Nate Eiesland – Drifting [TMN Premiere]

drifting
Nate Eiesland
Drifting

There are just a handful of things more powerful than flourishing love, and the fading of itself is one of the few that can rival it. Nate Eiesland‘s “Drifting” quickly captivates both the ears and the very hearts connected to it with its instrumental foundation of guitars pickings, elongated piano chords and lyricism that echos something that was once beautiful but is no more. A tale of longing, this track represents the second offering from The Red Album, a collaboration between Nate Eiesland (ON AN ON), Nygel Asselin (producer of Half Moon Run) and Toronto songstress, STACEY.

There are tracks that get you through your work day, others get you through the weekend, “Drifting” is not intended to get you anywhere. On the contrary, it is meant to simply keep you in the moment where the heart feels most comfortable.

Red Brick Songs is offering a collection of euphonious experiences brought together by fifteen songwriters form all over the North America under one musical retreat. We posted its first installment “Tunnels” a few weeks back so please check it out if you haven’t already.

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[Nu-Disco] Carousel – My New Friend (Avenue Remix)

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Carousel
My New Friend (Avenue Remix)

One of our favorite synthy pop tunes of 2014, Carousel’s “My New Friend” received a welcome and worthy makeover from 19 year-old Toronto based dance producer Avenue, and we still haven’t managed to shake those clubby rhythms from our consciousness since we gave it a first spin. It’s always inspiring to hear a tune from an act you love undergo a transformation through the lens of another artist’s perspective; especially when the result is as warm and bubbly as this. Avenue shifts cadence from the original towards a more club-friendly stride with a strong focus on an expanse of  uplifting airy synths to surely pull a bit of hip-wiggle and an insuppressible grin from its listener. This one’s being gifted as a free download, so nab a copy here, listen above and be on the prowl for more Avenue material in the near future.

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